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20-10-2016 16:27:57  #1


Tubby's Typewriter

Found this cute little silent film today on YouTube with the respective title:




​Funny how what seems to be a Yost can cause so much trouble back in the day!


A high schooler with a lot of typewriters. That's pretty much about it.
 

20-10-2016 17:05:33  #2


Re: Tubby's Typewriter

"I hear you were very smitten with my typeweriter,"  AAh!  there was the trouble.  Back then, a secretary, or typist, was called a "typewriter."  So Tubby's wife thought that, instead of her husband admiring a machine, he was admiring a woman--presumably a woman typist, or secretary.  The rest, they say, is history.  Incidentally, this year--1916--they had a very good Royal 10.  I wonder what he would have thought of those machines?


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

20-10-2016 20:03:54  #3


Re: Tubby's Typewriter

I just love what computers can do in the processing of old movies nowadays. This one has had motion stabilization to get rid of the frame jitter. But they haven't "de-speckled" it. Stabilized movies are much, much easier on my eyes! It may also have had some gray tone work done on it to bring out the shadows. Good looking clip now.


Bangin' around, this dirty old town, typin' for nickels and dimes...
 

03-12-2016 23:17:29  #4


Re: Tubby's Typewriter

It's amazing just what they can do to clean up sound and video in a way possibly better than it was when it came out.  I just wonder, incredibly young man that I am, if these older silent pictures always jittered and the "talkies" always crackled.  And now that technology came along to clear up these problems, we can enjoy these old classics like never before--like they cleared out the sogginess in animal crackers when they started sealing them in mylar bags instead of ones made of wax paper.


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

04-12-2016 13:06:59  #5


Re: Tubby's Typewriter

Today they need the Mylar bags because cookies now have a shelf-life of 2 years and are flown around the world. In 1916 a cookie made in New York probably never got further than Sacramento and was eaten within a month  

 

04-12-2016 18:14:35  #6


Re: Tubby's Typewriter

Rushwarp wrote:

Today they need the Mylar bags because cookies now have a shelf-life of 2 years and are flown around the world. In 1916 a cookie made in New York probably never got further than Sacramento and was eaten within a month  

Good thing--because they didn't have as many of those yummy preservatives and gmos we have now.  Back then, when food was decidedly more perishable, it had better be eaten by a certain time, or it spoiled quickly.
 


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

05-12-2016 00:04:21  #7


Re: Tubby's Typewriter

Rushwarp wrote:

Today they need the Mylar bags because cookies now have a shelf-life of 2 years and are flown around the world. In 1916 a cookie made in New York probably never got further than Sacramento and was eaten within a month  

I am sometimes amazed at stated shelf lives. There has been a small bottle of cayenne pepper kicking around my table for years and I happened to notice the 2019 expiration date yesterday. Huh? Why bother - just say it's eternal and be done with it. OTOH I found a partially eaten box of "Smacks" cereal recently cleaning out a cubicle at work, expired 2004. Just to be a hellion I sampled a single sugar coated puffed grain... ah, pretty much as it must have tasted before 2004.  Apparently it is completely chemically inert and and only sign it was not best by anymore was that all the cereal had clumped together.


"Damn the torpedoes! Four bells, Captain Drayton".
 

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