Typewriter Talk

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26-1-2017 00:12:33  #11


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

I guess that painting a typewriter could also be considered a type of aesthetic modification.  I've painted a few specimens--not exactly auto-rama material, but I like the looks of the ones I've done, and yes, they do look a bit more pleasing to the eye when I'm done.  My eye, that is--or do I need stronger glasses?  Anyway, they suit me, and that's the only important thing because they're MY machines!


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

26-1-2017 00:19:39  #12


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

Repartee wrote:

Regarding pads and sound absorption and acoustics, I wonder are you doing this because you are disturbing someone else or because the noise is disturbing to you?

If it's the latter then I would give yourself some more time with the machine.  I've grown to love the sound of some fairly noisy machines - fortunately I am not disturbing anybody else and it just sounds like work being done! The only style of sound I dislike is one that is both high pitched and loud - all slap and no chunk.

I don't recall a typewriter whose sound I disliked.  I've noticed some, like you said, have a bit higher a pitch in their hammering sound, while others, have a nice bottom quality--a more robust sound.  Underwood 150 and Touch-Master II machines have this sound.  You can not only hear it, you can feel it.  That's why so many people love their Underwood typewriters.  Olympias, now, have a high and a low at the same time.  While they have a nice bottoming sound to them you can feel, they also have a ring to the keystrike  as well.  I even like the little tinny clink-a-te-clink of my little "new" 1974 Brother Activator 800T (yes, it actually has a tabulator, this pocket-size miracle.  Only the stops are ten spaces apart, so I set the margins where I can get a five-space paragraph setting. 
 


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

26-1-2017 01:24:24  #13


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

Repartee: More of not disturbing my neighbours from the vibrations, since I live in an apartment.  

When using a flimsy table, the table literally shakes on every space bar touch. 
On my heavier more stable oak table, it's better but still rocks. 

http://diy.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/diy/fullset/2009/10/6/0/DHCR104_Countertop-Concrete-After_s4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.1280.960.jpeg


Concrete workbench anyone? 

 

     Thread Starter
 

26-1-2017 06:23:03  #14


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

TypewriterKing wrote:

 I even like the little tinny clink-a-te-clink of my little "new" 1974 Brother Activator 800T

I had forgotten the clink-a-te-clink variant. Before I had achieved typewriter gridlock with no work area (I just read in an old repair manual that a cluttered shop is no good. How was I have to have reached this subtle conclusion without seeing it written down?) I "repaired" a Holland made Royalite whose innards were loose in the shell.  They seem to have been attached by screws passing through grommets, but having no grommets I cleverly built up stacks of flat washers to fill the space. And was I pleased with myself.

It's rock-steady, that Royalite, but now each keystroke makes a tiny metallic ting so typing sounds like the anvil chorus.   


"Damn the torpedoes! Four bells, Captain Drayton".
 

26-1-2017 13:37:58  #15


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

SoucekFan wrote:

I like that you have a style to them.

Thank you, I'm very appreciative of your positive feedback!


Mockingbird wrote:

On my heavier more stable oak table, it's better but still rocks.

Is it the table or the typewriter that rocks?

Excessive noise can come from two sources. A hard platen can definitely affect the sound a machine makes; experiment with several backing sheets to test this. Also, vibration from the machines action can transfer to the work surface and be amplified by it. To counter this you should make sure that both the typewriter and the table are level and sit flat so that they can't rock, and then use a good felt pad to quell any vibration. If the table is sitting on a hard surface you could also try to isolate some of its vibration from the floor surface by placing its legs on a carpet or individual felt pads. You could also try moving the typewriter closer to one of the table's legs to see what effect that has on the overall noise level.

If these simple steps don't work, then you might want to look at buying a quieter portable, but a word of caution: some quiet/silent/noiseless models are actually not that much better than their regular counterpart.


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

27-1-2017 20:42:06  #16


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

Uwe, thanks so much. I completely forgot about using felt pads between the table and wooden floor. 

This has made all the difference! 

     Thread Starter
 

28-1-2017 00:15:05  #17


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

Of course, you don't have to move a table to a wooden floor just to put felt pads under it--you could put the table on a carpeted floor--or use carpet pieces should you find yourself bereft of felt.


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

28-1-2017 00:53:56  #18


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

???

Self-adhesive felt pads for furniture are far easier to find than a typewriter, and they even have them in Japan.

 


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

28-1-2017 17:14:05  #19


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

I'm sure they are.  I even remember some round pads stuck onto 4" pieces of steel that you could put under a desk or table.  I was just saying that a carpeted floor, or even just a rug under the table or desk was just as viable as the pads.


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

01-2-2017 02:05:09  #20


Re: Typewriter Tune Ups & Modifications

Has anyone else tuned up their typewriter to adjust the typing action? I have pretty strong likes and dislikes with regard to the action of my typewriters. I don't like the heavy action of my Olympia SM9, where I need to press deep to get a clear imprint, but rather like the Adler Tippa's heavy but shallow action. My favorite among the portables, however, is the Olivetti Studio 42 (which resembles later models too). I've muddled with the screws under the escapement to have it trip just after the type slug makes contact with the paper. There are some typewriters where I'd love to be able to fine tune like that . . . like my 1960s Hermes 3000. Does anyone have experience adjusting the action of that model? Or have tips for others, like the Hermes Baby, Royal FP, etc? These are the modifications that make a big difference for me . . . backing sheets, soundproofing, mats, etc, are secondary to the typing action.
-Eric

 

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