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09-10-2018 03:22:26  #11


Re: A few questions from a new typewriter ally!

The one thing that you can say about using traditional rubber is that it has been proven to work since the 1870's.  Not that I am against new developments.  If it was true that we couldn't do something because we had never done it before, we would still all be in the cradle being fed with a bottle !  I'm still interested to hear if anyone on here has tried a turboplaten on their machine and what they thought of it.  Also - and this has just occurred to me - does anyone know if there is anywhere in the world that is still capable of recovering a platen in cork ?  You get a worse paper feed because cork does not grip like rubber, but cork doesn't deteriorate in the same way either and can still be resilient after 70 years !

 

10-10-2018 00:32:33  #12


Re: A few questions from a new typewriter ally!

I question whether the turboplaten guy is using this material because he honestly thinks it is better than rubber, rather than it is the only material he is able to do DIY platen recovery jobs with and has come up with the justification after the fact.

 

16-10-2018 21:27:52  #13


Re: A few questions from a new typewriter ally!

Here is my platen recovery technique for an LC Smith 8:

1) lightly line the platen with rubber cement
2) roll a sheet of heavyweight paper around the platen
3) type

It was all serendipitous - the rubber cement was to grip the paper because the hard platen was just so slick, but even after it dried it kept seizing the backing sheet and wrapping it around the platen, so finally I said the heck with it, that's the new platen surface. Not as daft as it sounds: it grips paper, it's more resilient than the hard rubber and surprisingly durable - seems after it's been beaten down a certain amount it does not readily get beaten any thinner and at this point it's still slightly resilient. This was a machine which seemed to taunt me to put it to the curb because of its hundred little quirky problems, so a paper covered platen just seems right.

 

17-10-2018 09:29:45  #14


Re: A few questions from a new typewriter ally!

UnderwoodStd wrote:

1) lightly line the platen with rubber cement
2) roll a sheet of heavyweight paper around the platen
3) type

I wouldn't recommend that anyone do this to their typewriter.

Have you tried a rubber rejuvenator spray? I've had good results with hard platens, it softens the rubber a few points on the Shore scale, which can be the difference between unusable and useable with a few backing sheets. And did you check the machine's feed rollers? They're typically in worse condition and can also contribute to paper grip issues.


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

18-10-2018 19:23:41  #15


Re: A few questions from a new typewriter ally!

Thank you for your comments.  I'm not sure I "did" anything to the typewriter, rubber cement does not form a permanent bond and I could peel the paper off easily enough, but perhaps rubber rejuvenator would achieve the very slight tack I was aiming for with rubber cement in a more controlled way -- no stuck paper.

The platen by the way is like slate - it looks brand new, not a sign of use but rock hard. So it is quite slick.  

 

19-10-2018 03:06:01  #16


Re: A few questions from a new typewriter ally!

As a professional, it isn't something that I would do either - but it is easy to scoff when you have regular access to a firm who can re-cover platens with new rubber.  To be fair, you are just using a 'permanent' backing sheet, and if it helps in the short term - why not ?  I doubt that the rubber cement would harm the platen, which needs re-covering in any case.  If you grow to really like the machine, consider investing in a properly, professionally, re-covered platen when you can afford it.  It will transform your typewriter !

 

19-10-2018 22:12:59  #17


Re: A few questions from a new typewriter ally!

When will I learn... 


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

20-10-2018 02:51:33  #18


Re: A few questions from a new typewriter ally!

Not telling you off Uwe !      Just saying that generally it is easy to forget that not everyone has the knowledge, contacts and expertise.  Besides, typing on a rock-hard platen will eventually flatten the typeface and at least the paper covering prevents that until a proper recovered platen can be fitted.

 

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