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16-11-2015 17:39:57  #11


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

Both odious and hilarious. I really don't know what on earth they were thinking. I mean that thing is made so badly... maybe there is a subject for an art student's dissertation in pieces like this. But staring at it for too long might send you to a place you were never able to escape from.
An ideal piece to have in a room for very unwelcome guests.
I would love to break it.

 

16-11-2015 19:01:52  #12


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

"I would love to break it."

I hope you mean just the weird light thingy... Not the entire typewriter...

People are so strange.. Really. Who makes one out of a corroding copper  pipe?


Back from a long break.

Starting fresh with my favorite typer. A Royal Futura!
 

16-11-2015 19:03:00  #13


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

*Wait Im sorry, its not cording, the soldering looks green on my screen.


Lets try this again

Who makes one with only like 10 piano keys? What happened to the other 70 on a real piano?


Back from a long break.

Starting fresh with my favorite typer. A Royal Futura!
 

17-11-2015 14:23:16  #14


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

Ha, yeah, the light thing I would break, the awful fake piano keys... the rest I would want to try to restore - somehow.

 

19-11-2015 22:48:20  #15


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

malole wrote:

Both odious and hilarious. I really don't know what on earth they were thinking.

I feel certain this is a product of other motives than artistic creation. I can't image anyone stepped back from that and felt they had created beauty! Only question is is the maker rubbing his hands together more anticipating smirking at people he outrages or gulls, or at the possibility of pocketing $500 if he finds a big enough fool.


"Damn the torpedoes! Four bells, Captain Drayton".
 

06-8-2016 16:22:23  #16


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

Repartee wrote:

malole wrote:

Both odious and hilarious. I really don't know what on earth they were thinking.

I feel certain this is a product of other motives than artistic creation. I can't image anyone stepped back from that and felt they had created beauty! Only question is is the maker rubbing his hands together more anticipating smirking at people he outrages or gulls, or at the possibility of pocketing $500 if he finds a big enough fool.

The death of something--or someone--is always saddening.  We as devotees of the Writing Machine have witnessed many a typewriter's last stand on a desk.  I have.  Some machines I've sorely missed, others not so much.  One I even hurled out a window.  But, even though this thread is very old, I would like to touch on my take on what happens to old typewriters after they've gone past their mechanical ability to produce a printed page.  In addition to the monstrosities I've seen here, I've also seen old typewriters used as planters.  They continue their rusting away as the wet soil eats away at the metal.  To be honest, I have found that the main thing to consider is if that machine can be recycled into parts for other machines (a lot of old typewriters are in need of spare parts), or, ultimately, taken to the scrapyard where the metal can be recycled into other products.  But the monstrosities.  You say that profit is the motive for a lot of these "artists."  I agree.  In fact, they have been quite successful in finding buyers for their creations--or--mutations.  Remember, everyone, not everyone reveres typewriters the way we do.  They don't understand them.  If it isn't represented in how many terabytes of RAM, ROM, or whatever, it is meaningless.  As a typewriter enthusiast myself, I will continue to buy a few wherever I can, fix whatever I can, and, if I can't fix it, I will use it for parts.  And if I can't use it for parts, or if I have used all the parts I could, I will then inter the machine at the local metal scrapyard so it can reincarnate into something new.
 


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

08-8-2016 01:18:47  #17


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

The seller calls it an Industrial Steampunk Plasma Typewriter.

http://oi66.tinypic.com/2v1t99x.jpg


http://oi66.tinypic.com/20haqva.jpg


http://oi65.tinypic.com/2cdwgg4.jpg


I just don't know what to make of it.

 

10-8-2016 05:37:15  #18


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

In Spain we have a nice word to describe this: Hartistas.

An artista is an artist, of course. Someone who makes art pieces, and that can´t be taken lightly. Art is something worthy, something that moves your emotions.

But what happens when someone pretends to be an artist and (what´s even worse) someone else feeds that troll? You get an hartista, which is a play on words of harto (fed up with something) + artista (artist). This goes with a lot of "modern" "artists".

With the poor Royal P is pretty much the same. You pretend your crap is art. First of all, it isn´t because the quality is, ahem, not there. Secondly, you´ve destroyed something much more valuable in the process. Next stop: someone might find your "creation" interesting, and that´s putting out a fire with gasoline. Every way you look at it, it´s wrong. It´s no a matter of underrating the work of someone who might have done it with the best intention (who am I to contend that), it´s that the result is plainly wrong.

Sometimes I see these kind of things at shops on displays, and at least for me they get the opposite effect of what was intended. Yeah, they catch my attention, and they make me want to turn away from that shop. Is there any need to destroy a typewriter?

This is a bit of a rant, but that´s how I see it. If a typewriter can´t work anymore, its pieces can help other typewriters. And if you are going to make something different, it´d better be REAL good.


TaktaktataktaktakcluccluctaktaktaktaktakDINGtaktaktaktakCREEEEEEEEECtaktaktak...

(Olivetti Linea 98)
 
 

10-8-2016 08:42:35  #19


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

Having spent most of a long working life on the design of feature films, where all sorts of objects, scenes and places have to be created from nothing, I suppose the thing that rankles most is the sheer design ineptitude of the new pieces.  They convey nothing and they support, clarify or suggest nothing,  They are a design void.
Compare this to the functional beauty of the machine underneath, which says a great deal without even trying to convey anything!  The decorations added, are precisely the opposite: they try and try and try to say something, but have nothing to say in the first place, desperate as they in the attempt to borrow some meaning from the typewriter.  When you add to this vapidity, the destruction of a clever, beautiful and useful machine, the hackles rise.  All I can wish for the perpetrator of this travesty is that they find something to say and then find away to say it.


Sincerely,
beak.
 
 

10-8-2016 11:51:28  #20


Re: The Death of a Typewriter

^this.

 

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