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08-2-2017 17:47:59  #21


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

There is a big difference between calling something a Rocket or a Baby!  

The Rocket model name was in use long before the late '50s, I think as early as the late '30s, which was almost right after the introduction of the Baby. I'm not sure if anyone has figured out why Hermes used the two names, I used to think that it just depended on where the model was being sold, but then it seems that both names were used in the same markets, so I don't know.

According to my dictionary, the word rocket has been around since the early 1500s and was originally used to identify a type of cabbage, and when it was actually first used to describe a projectile (early 1600s), the name was a reference to the projectile's shape. In short, although I agree with you that it is a very cool name for a space-age typewriter model, the name predates that time period and maybe was only used because it sounded much better than a Hermes Cabbage. 


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

09-8-2017 22:24:20  #22


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

I have both of these, and I prefer the more substantial feel of the Olympia. I also like that has a smaller type. My Rocket types in 10, while my SF types 11 per inch.

 

10-8-2017 09:20:02  #23


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

I have to disagree here and unequivocally go with the rocket.

I have a 1968 rocket (the later generation with longer return lever) and just picked up an SF Deluxe last week. Got lucky enough that both have script typeface but the feel of the SF, in my opinion, is far inferior to the rocket. The keys are very slushy on SF, as I've heard others attest to as well. This does hamper speed at times. By comparison, the feel of the rocket was spring-like. And i could not type fast enough to jam it up.


My rocket was also a unique specimen (I think) in that it had a CPI of 13, quite small type. I'm not sure on the SF, although for me, it wouldn't matter.

 

10-8-2017 10:16:14  #24


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

schyllerwade wrote:

... the SF, in my opinion, is far inferior to the rocket. The keys are very slushy on SF, as I've heard others attest to as well.

​Your SF DE LUXE must need either maintenance or repair because there's no way that one in good condition could ever be described as being "far inferior" to a Hermes Rocket. And I have no idea what "slushy" keys are; the key lever action of a SF and SF De Luxe is among the most solid feeling of all the ultra-portable models.
 


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

10-8-2017 11:55:46  #25


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

Speaking of which, is the SF in any way similar to the Splendid 33? If so, it must be a really good machine. And so far, Olympia beats Hermes for me. Not by much, though. But a second generation Baby versus a Splendid 33 has a clear result, clearer than in other potential matches: Olympia wins.

As a final note, I´ve still to try a third generation Baby, so I´m a bit lost here an my opinion is quite pointless because it doesn´t address the OP´s question.


TaktaktataktaktakcluccluctaktaktaktaktakDINGtaktaktaktakCREEEEEEEEECtaktaktak...

(Olivetti Linea 98)
 
 

10-8-2017 14:03:43  #26


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

schyllerwade wrote:

My rocket was also a unique specimen (I think) in that it had a CPI of 13, quite small type. I'm not sure on the SF, although for me, it wouldn't matter.

I would love to find one like this. I'm not a fan of large 10 pitch, and so many typewriters come with it. 
 

 

10-8-2017 14:45:53  #27


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

Javi wrote:

Speaking of which, is the SF in any way similar to the Splendid 33?

​It's basically the same machine. After the SF was first introduced, Olympia began to offer different feature sets and colours for the model, which is why there are a number of different names for the SF.




 


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

10-8-2017 15:51:37  #28


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

 Maybe it does need a tune up idk
 I know I'm not the first person to ever complain about the feel of the key action though 

 trust me I was disappointed as anyone on this forum to find that I didn't enjoy the feel. I actually hope you're right, that or I just have the most finely tuned hermes rocket on the planet...
 

 

11-8-2017 14:06:28  #29


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

schyllerwade wrote:

I know I'm not the first person to ever complain about the feel of the key action though

​Well that's the internet for you, a world-wide and wonderful source of misinformation. Of those who complained, what were their experience levels with typewriters, and with developing an objective critique? And in what condition was the SF they were complaining about in?

There's a glaring chasm between someone who has used and is familiar with dozens of different ultra-portable models and the person who owns two or three (and only one example of each model). I own around a dozen SF-based models, and have used many more, and there is a consistency in their performance and the feel of their type action, which tends to be heavier than some ultra-portables such as those that were made by Hermes. In terms of this comparison, it's without hesitation that I would describe the SF to be a more robust typewriter than any of the Hermes models.
 


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

12-8-2017 10:02:50  #30


Re: Which one: Olympia SF or Hermes Rocket?

Well, if there were an objective engineering language for discussing actions then we would be able to discuss actions in objective engineering language.  If we were engineers by inclination.  Right now we are in the Thomas Kuhn (name dropping) pre-paradigm stage.  No shame in that: most things, most of the time are in the pre-paradigm stage and never advance beyond that, so we just blunder along as best we can.  

I wonder if even typewriter designers had objective engineering language -- they were doubtless close but the design of actions may have remained a black art, like the tempering of swords before metallurgy.


"Damn the torpedoes! Four bells, Captain Drayton".
 

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