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26-2-2017 16:37:49  #41


Re: Why do electronic typewriters get short shrift?

pdxtypewriter wrote:

Anybody ever used a 1960 SC Electra 12? There's one in my neighborhood and I thought I'd take a look.

To be fair, it's not an electronic typewriter, so it doesn't really compare to those being discussed in this thread. On it's own those 6-series Smith-Corona models that use standard ribbon spools are worth grabbing when working and inexpensive. I love using them, but rarely do because I get too easily distracted by the electric motor humming "get to work" over and over again.


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

26-2-2017 17:01:18  #42


Re: Why do electronic typewriters get short shrift?

Uwe wrote:

pdxtypewriter wrote:

Anybody ever used a 1960 SC Electra 12? There's one in my neighborhood and I thought I'd take a look.

To be fair, it's not an electronic typewriter, so it doesn't really compare to those being discussed in this thread. On it's own those 6-series Smith-Corona models that use standard ribbon spools are worth grabbing when working and inexpensive. I love using them, but rarely do because I get too easily distracted by the electric motor humming "get to work" over and over again.

These are electro-mechanical, right? Are they easier to repair, or when they go south are they door stops?

 

26-2-2017 23:45:43  #43


Re: Why do electronic typewriters get short shrift?

http://i.imgur.com/taT5cd3.jpg?1

I LOVE using this as well. What a nice diversion from regular machines. Very fun indeed. I'm glad I bought it, and wouldn't have even considered it without your comment above, so thank you, Uwe..

 

27-2-2017 15:53:59  #44


Re: Why do electronic typewriters get short shrift?

I had forgotten which model the Electra 12 was, so I should correct my previous comment by mentioning that it's actually a Super-5 model based on the Electric Portable, and not a 6-series model. Regardless, I have an even greater enthusiasm for the Super-5 electric models and wish the one I owned looked as good as yours. 


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

27-7-2018 09:23:17  #45


Re: Why do electronic typewriters get short shrift?

Hi,
​As with anything else, we have purists.  When Porsche introduced the 924 in 1976 with the first liquid cooled engine in the company's history, purists were outraged.  Now Porsche makes a sedan.  Wedges, but in particular word processors, filled a brief need--from about 1982 to 1994--for those who didn't want a standard typewriter but could not afford a computer ($2500-$3000 was quite a sum in 1988).  Swintec and Nakajima/Royal still make wedges.   I have a Royal (Nakajima) Scriptor, purchased new last April.  I use it for typing on 11X17" paper.  I also use it when I need crisp, virtually flawless type.  When I want an impression with more character (no pun intended), I switch to my Brother Challenger 11.  I like the Royal Scriptor because it's loud, and it has a mechanical IBM PS2 style keyboard, so typing on it is a very tactile and auditory experience.  Plus, the outer lip at the base of the keyboard is breadbasket style, resembling a Commodore 64 housing--nice.

​I prefer a manual, but have problem using the wedge when the situation calls for it.

 

28-7-2018 18:44:21  #46


Re: Why do electronic typewriters get short shrift?

I like typewriters for two reasons: 1) They are simple and retro and I am a nerd, 2) When wanting to get good prose written, they encourage you to slow down and think and commit to print something you are happy with first time, since it's hard to edit.

For me, electric typewriters satisfy 2) as much as mechanicals do. Many of them even satisfy 1).

I find electrics harder to fix so far. One I bought advertised as dead, and it was still dead when I binned it. The other had badly vertically-misaligned type between upper and lower case, and I managed to fix that (shattered washers, just managed to get a screwdriver where it was needed underneath the transformer so didn't need to disassemble it all, but if I had needed to, I might not have bothered).

The latter I still have and I love. It's a great hybrid between mechanical and electrical. It's not electronic, nor especially clever. For example, you can get the slugs to jam if you press two keys at exactly the same time, just like with a pure mechanical. And I don't like the noise it makes with the motor running constantly, but an old felt mat helps hugely with that, so again it's a nice blend of old and new (/less old). Even the printed characters are not consistent - they vary less than with a mechanical, but they still vary. Personally I like that. I can type very fast on it, but someone reading the output is likely to enjoy the novelty that it looks like it was hammered out on an old fashioned mechanical.

 

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