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11-4-2019 20:33:29  #1


Odd 1941 Smith-Corona Model 3A

Newbie to this forum, and glad to be part of the community!  I recently purchased a pre-war Smith-Corona model 3A, and noticed a couple of interesting details that I haven't seen on any other models.  First, and most obvious, is the Corona logo on both the top cover and paper table.  I have never seen a Corona-marked paper table for this model, as they are usually marked with "Standard," "Sterling," or "Silent."  Secondly, the Corona logo on the top cover has a "shadow," that looks like it was painted over and re-printed on the machine.  Both the logo and the surrounding crinkle paint appear to be factory-applied, but I don't know why they would have done this.  Perhaps a manufacturing error?  Both of these details have me stumped, so appreciate any insight or feedback you experts may have.  I appreciate your time and attention, and look forward to solving this mystery!
https://ibb.co/GxGx3dz
  
https://ibb.co/qD7CTMX

https://i.ibb.co/fXq9jYB/Corona-close.jpg

https://i.ibb.co/xCwC82x/SC-Sterling.jpg


[EDIT---> Added correct image links to post. Uwe]

Last edited by Uwe (14-4-2019 14:29:45)

 

14-4-2019 14:22:35  #2


Re: Odd 1941 Smith-Corona Model 3A

I would assume it was factory rebuilt at some time after the company had changed its name to Smith-Corona. It could have been that the only decals they still had left were the Corona name badge, which is why they're identical on the paper table and ribbon cover. 

There's something else worth consideration. I've wondered in the past about the significance of the pinstriping patterns used on Corona and Smith-Corona portables. I'd always assumed that late '30s portables used a three-stripe pattern, the war-era models no striping at all, and the first post-war Smith-Corona machines two stripes (like on your machine). Based on its paint and pinstriping, if I glanced at your machine at a market I wouldn't have assumed it to be a 1941 model because your typewriter is identical in every way, aside from the Corona badging, to my 1946 Smith-Corona.

Out of curiosity, what's the serial number on your Corona?


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

15-4-2019 00:50:06  #3


Re: Odd 1941 Smith-Corona Model 3A

Thanks for the feedback, Uwe!  Your explanation is similar to what I've been theorizing as well, but I haven't seen another typewriter like it.  My serial number is 3A96925, and internet research suggests it was produced in 1941.  Like you, I also wondered about the striping patterns, and assumed (perhaps falsely) that one stripe was for SC Standard models, two stripes for Sterling, and three stripes for Silent.  I'm still not convinced this is true across the board, as there aren't many absolutes in the manufacturing of these machines over the years.  I am not surprised this machine looks similar to your 1946 3C, as the Streamline body was introduced in 1939, and continued for several more years following WWII.  Main differences that I can see, is that the majority of the 41's internal parts are blued instead of bright, and it has a shorter carriage return handle.  Also, the removable tab stops are a different design as well, although I think they are interchangeable across all years. 

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17-4-2019 12:48:35  #4


Re: Odd 1941 Smith-Corona Model 3A

Uwe...also, thanks for making my photos appear on this page.  Can you tell me how you did that?  I followed the instructions in the forum, but it obviously didn't work.  Much appreciated!

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17-4-2019 17:03:43  #5


Re: Odd 1941 Smith-Corona Model 3A

No problem, Essentially you just want to use the direct link from where you're hosting it, and paste that link in the pop-up box when you click the Image icon. Don't use the "embed" code that these services provide.

I found your theory about the pinstriping representing the model interesting. It's not something I've noticed before, but will have to take another look and see if it could be a possibility.

When I suggested that your machine looked like my '46 I was talking about the type of paint and striping it has, not the case design or the fact it's the same model. All of the earlier '40s models I've come across were finished as you would expect a war-time model, with less embellishments (no pinstriping at all). Again, this would suggest the possibility that your machine was refurbished, perhaps during the late '40s before the 5-series models replaced them.


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

17-4-2019 17:24:07  #6


Re: Odd 1941 Smith-Corona Model 3A

O, please, please do not let it catch on, to call those shiny stripes on the ribbon covers of certain Smith-Corona portables of the '40s "pinstripes". "Pinstripe" already has a clear and useful meaning---thin, even delicate, painted stripes or, nowdays, decal imitations of them. My 1910 Royal has pinstripes; my 1948 S-C Sterling does not.
Those stripe designs on the S-C covers have been referred to as "chevrons" or "stripes" and probably other terms (probably someone has even called them "racing stripes"!) and we know what they mean.
I too have wondered whether the number and layout of the stripes correlates with models or years or something else. It'll be interesting to see what we figure out here.

 

18-4-2019 13:37:50  #7


Re: Odd 1941 Smith-Corona Model 3A

I believe--and I could be wrong--that in the first couple of years of production, the matte finish versions of both the Silent and the Sterling speedline models had three stripes. Sometime around 1940 and after, the Sterlings went to two stripes. The Standard model had the chevron stripe.

 

24-4-2019 23:18:54  #8


Re: Odd 1941 Smith-Corona Model 3A

Uwe...thanks for the info on posting photos.  My typewriter still remains a mystery, but will advise if/when I discover anything further.  

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