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Portable Typewriters » Olympia SM9 (question) » 05-2-2023 09:52:36

M. Höhne
Replies: 22

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This is the kind of hard-won, empirical knowledge that is so useful to us restorers and just plain repairers. Thanks so much for your curiosity and energy and skills, Pete!

Typewriter Paraphernalia » Typing Paper Weight » 22-1-2023 00:04:23

M. Höhne
Replies: 9

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WJC wrote:

What is paper "sizing" by the way? I see it mentioned a lot in relation to typewriters, but whenever I look it up I can only get results for different sizes of paper.

In my internet search for "sizing", the very first hit is for this article in Wkikpedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sizing

 

Maintenance & Repairs » 1976 Hermes Baby plastic body removal? » 10-12-2022 16:31:31

M. Höhne
Replies: 9

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Kalani wrote:

snip ....  any advice on how to take the typewriter out of the plastic body. It appears to be able to slide out the back once the back panel is off and screws removed, but. . . not so ..... snip

That's the way mine came apart, like a foot in a shoe. I don't remember any particular hassle in getting it out beyond the usual fussy maneuvering.

The World of Typewriters » Paintings & Illustrations Of Typewriters... » 08-12-2022 10:14:45

M. Höhne
Replies: 28

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Pete, would you please attribute these artworks and credit the artists? They sure deserve it.

Off-Topic » Amusing Poster » 22-10-2022 08:38:22

M. Höhne
Replies: 11

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Uwe wrote:

Yes, and yes... I was just making light of the fact that they couldn't have chosen a worse portable typewriter to use for the original poster Sky posted. However, I didn't think that I was being insulting; I challenge anyone to defend the performance or build quality of the Corsair (or its variants). I've had a few pass through my collection and only kept one as an example to demonstrate the effect  '60s Japanese machines had on Smith-Corona. 

Ha, ha. My comment about insulting was based on the pretense that this was really visible in a public waiting room, and a casual viewer, one not in the least aware of Corsairs, would infer that anyone who had a typewriter would be a tasteless dolt. I'm glad this has been sorted out. This poster's sponsor is particularly clever. Thanks, guys.

I too have had several Corsairs pass through my hands and I wish I had one now to take a part from (the CR lever and its mount assembly) to fix an otherwise good Super G in brilliant orange. The key phrase here is "pass through my hands", eh?
 

Off-Topic » Amusing Poster » 21-10-2022 08:42:59

M. Höhne
Replies: 11

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The design of Uwe's find in the optometrist's office is puzzling and on the face of it insulting. The idea that using a typewriter in one's youth is an example of poor judgement?
The poster would make more sense in an Ear, Nose, and Throat Specialist's office, except the image would still be puzzling. Try again, Designer.  This is the poster poster for the Campaign for Better Clip Art.
 

The World of Typewriters » Bob Montgomery Quote... » 17-8-2022 06:41:24

M. Höhne
Replies: 3

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Pete, thank you for recalling that important idea to our attention. A printout of your sign will go up in my workshop.

Typewriter Paraphernalia » Ribbon Tins... » 06-8-2022 16:16:11

M. Höhne
Replies: 29

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You're building a beautiful collection, Pete!

But if you're keeping track of such things, it will help to know that all the aircraft in your last posting are more or less generic; the 3rd is definitely generic and not a B-17, the ones on the Carter's Guardian are definitely not B-52s and probably generic, and the ones on the all-blue tin are mostly B-52 but with a mash-up with the B-47 plus a few liberties.

I suppose you are just calling them this for your own reference but in the future when people are examining these like coins and stamps to determine values, these documented details will count. Cheers!
 

Type Talk » Is it possible to date this font? and what was used to type it? » 29-7-2022 10:58:18

M. Höhne
Replies: 11

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fuss wrote:

Interesting, any idea when this was a "thing" to use those?

I wasn't there but I'm quite sure that text printed on ribbons was common during the 19th century and later. They could be pinned to or tied around a great variety of merchandise and academic inventory. I wouldn't have much hope for dating that mineral with this bit of evidence, unless maybe you want to get into deep forensics and analyze the fabric and ink chemically and microscopically. especially since the label could have been added at any time after the unearthing of the mineral. This is sounding like an X-Y problem; is there no other information surrounding this sample? What is the significance of knowing the date of it?

Type Talk » Line Spacings From One To Three » 27-7-2022 16:48:25

M. Höhne
Replies: 19

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On most typewriters, the line spacing is controlled by the line space lever and implemented by that lever positioning a ramp that determines where the line space pawl is allowed (by the ramp) to drop down and catch the ratchet. The position of the ramp determines how far the pawl travels before it drops onto the ratchet. Then the pawl pushes the ratchet all the way to a stop; if it drops earlier, it will carry three teeth to the stop, resulting in triple spacing or if it drops later it might catch only one tooth to carry to the stop, resulting in single spacing. On a full-space tw, the pawl can catch either 1, 2, or 3 teeth of the ratchet. On a half-spacing tw, the pawl can drop earlier and push as many as 6 teeth to the end, for triple spacing, or if it drops later it may only catch as few as 2 teeth to the stop, resulting in single spacing. I can't off-hand think of a tw that has a setting for half-spacing (as opposed to 1.5 or 2.5) Each "click" you hear is one tooth on its way to the stop.

Electric tws work the same way but might be a little harder to see or follow. Always excepting Selectric, of course. Electronic ones, you're on your own to figure out, probably a stepper motor.

Regarding that triple-spacing for headlines, etc., it is a trivial task to just slap the CR lever three or two times for a triple space---surely easier than reaching out to set the line space lever to 3, work the CR lever, then reach back again to reset the line space lever back to what it was, so I doubt that was the reason manufacturers added the 3. I think it's more likely that they thought, Hey, we already have a way to adjust 1 or 2 lines; why not just lengthen the ramp a tiny bit and advertise a wider range than the competition? and then the competition quickly figured out they had to do that, too. I leave it to some historian to discover the timeline of the first appearance of this feature, and then the second appearance, and then the tenth appearance.

Wow! Typewr

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