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The World of Typewriters » Huge Tytell Typewriter archive acquired by The Internet Archive » 31-8-2020 17:09:46

Nicole
Replies: 2

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Looks like an amazing range of machines, manuals and books that they will be digitising!

Check it out here:
[url= http://blog.archive.org/2020/08/26/an-archive-of-a-different-type/]Blog post at the Internet Archive[/url]

Type Talk » Recent Acquisitions Thread » 07-3-2017 03:56:22

Nicole
Replies: 1978

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My latest is this little beauty: 1957 Royal Quiet De Luxe, serial AE3725478 with the tan crinkle paint (which looks like a rosy pink) and lovely cream keys. I paid a fortune to have it shipped from the US but it was totally worth it. She’s a beauty, just needs a good clean, mainly on the outside. The internals are very clean and it looks like it was stored in its case a lot, so that’s good. Types well although there is an issue with the backspace which is apparently a symptom of a different escapement issue. Trying to figure that out now.

I have already been through the process of cleaning up an older grey model’s crinkle paint so I’m pretty confident I can get all the ink stains off.



Type Talk » Typewriters in Television and Film » 21-2-2017 19:16:02

Nicole
Replies: 26

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I actually got the episode details off by one episode, it's Episode 11 and it's called "Santa's Secret Stuff" — sorry about that.

It's definitely electric though. It's hard to find a clip anywhere, but you can hear it whirring away, and she only taps on the keys lightly, Then she switches it off on its right-hand side when she is finished, and the whirring stops.

For anyone with the DVD or Netflix, for reference this is at about 35:45 into the episode.

Type Talk » Typewriters in Television and Film » 20-2-2017 18:31:05

Nicole
Replies: 26

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Gilmore Girls
Season 7, Episode 12: "To Whom It May Concern"


Luke asks Lorelai to write him a character reference but the words just won't come. She says:

"You know I bet my problem is? The whole writing-by-hand thing. You know I think what would help is if I got my old electric typewriter out. The soothing sound of that irritating buzzing -- that's what would help me."



By using the typewriter, she gets the job done

I'm not very good with electric typewriters so I'm not sure what model this is.

Standard Typewriters » How to tell the type pitch of a standard machine » 15-2-2017 22:15:42

Nicole
Replies: 5

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A-ha! Thank you so much for explaining all of that, that is hugely helpful. I was quite confused about the markings and what to look at. So I guess I really will need to measure things if I want to be sure of the type pitch — or at least ask sellers to measure them for me. Thanks again so much — I really appreciate it!

Standard Typewriters » How to tell the type pitch of a standard machine » 13-2-2017 00:01:15

Nicole
Replies: 5

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Oh no, my calculations are all wrong actually, upon reflection none of them make sense. I don't know what the width of portable platens is supposed to be, but I have been told that it's pretty much uniform across all makes and models.

Please do go back to assuming I have no idea what I'm talking about — I obviously don't!  

 

Standard Typewriters » How to tell the type pitch of a standard machine » 12-2-2017 23:58:39

Nicole
Replies: 5

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M. Höhne wrote:

Nicole, pica is ten characters per inch and elite is 12 characters per inch, so if you can find out or guess the length of the carriage you can easily calculate whether you are looking at pica or elite. (That "up to 100 or 80" is meaningless without knowing the length of the platen.) If you are in a position to measure or ask the seller to measure, you can simply count the number of tick marks in one inch. Now, some typewriters, notably Olympias in my experience, have 11 cpi or sometimes other pitches. If you must have elite, it's 12 cpi.

Thanks M.! I do understand the concept of CPI, and I have heard that apparently all portable platens are 10" wide, so that is why you can quickly check the highest number on the paper bail and instantly have your answer on type size. I guess I could better have posed my question by asking if Standard typewriters always have the same platen length as well, or if they vary from model to model.

In light of your answer, I'm now wondering — are the larger paper bail markings always split into 1" segments? Can you just count the number of smaller markings in each segment to get your cpi? Or is it always necessary to get a proper measurement of the platen?

Thanks!

Standard Typewriters » How to tell the type pitch of a standard machine » 12-2-2017 19:34:16

Nicole
Replies: 5

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Previously you clever folk enlightened me about how you can look at the paper bail bar on a portable and see instantly if it's a Pica or an Elite machine since the markings will go up to 100 on a machine with Elite type, and only up to 80 on a machine with Pica type. 

Since this is all down to the width of the carriage, how can you tell the difference on Standards? Are the carriage widths standard or do they vary? (Aside from there being normal width and those super-wide carriages that I have seen.)

I'm only interested in machines with Elite type, so it will be helpful if I can identify this in photographs before I travel any distance to inspect or buy machines.

Thanks in advance!

Parts » WTB Mainspring for 1937 Remington Noiseless Portable » 12-2-2017 19:20:17

Nicole
Replies: 0

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Hi again! Yes, I am suddenly busy again with my machines after a long absence

I'm looking for a mainspring for my 1937 Remington Noiseless Portable (serial N121425).

I broke it myself whilst trying to fix the broken drawband — basically the most heartbreaking moment in my life thus far! 

Also, is it ever possible to fit a mainspring from a different model? If it's the same size and shape?

Thanks in advance for any help.

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