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Type Talk » Recent Acquisitions Thread » 16-6-2021 20:07:31

Argio
Replies: 1833

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I found myself today with this, for free, an Adler Electric 21 (i am not sure if this is a 21C or a 21D ). It is completely filthy, but it wants to work, I tested it and some keys do move as intended, others move once but the carriage does not advance. I have so many questions since I was not able to find any technical manual or documentation for this model. I might open a new topic documenting my repair adventures for this behemoth.
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Typewriters - Private Sellers Only » WTB: Underwood Model 3 or 5 » 19-1-2021 08:47:21

Argio
Replies: 3

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(Soft) NLR
I m still interested in acquiring a Underwood 5, or 3, but is no longer an "immediate" interest; as a different project caught my attention and budget. I still would like to see offers, if any.

Typewriters - Private Sellers Only » WTB: Underwood Model 3 or 5 » 04-1-2021 19:43:30

Argio
Replies: 3

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It has come to my interest the acquisition of an Underwood typewriter, particularly a model 3 o 5, models which are not necessarily common at my location. I am hesitant to take the well-known risks for buying online in not specialised places (overpricing and bad packaging), therefore the reason of this post/buying order. 

I can accept machines in general suboptimal conditions as a restoration project, for which I have guidelines I will detail next.

- Dirt and gunk: Accepted, even if this has halted to some extend the functionality of the machine. 

- Rust: Acceptable as long it does not compromise the structural integrity of any part or has turned the machine into an immobile block of rust. 

- Paint and chrome/nickel: Irrelevant; a well conserved paint is appreciated, but I can accept an exemplar that has scuffs, lost it's decals, parts of the paint, etc.

- Bendings and dents: Acceptable as long they are not extended, critical or compromise the intended functionality of the machine.

- Cracks, fissures, and fractures: These are unacceptable in the frame or any other critical part, otherwise, some small cracks might be accepted.

- Draw band: Irrelevant, however, the retainers, or hooks, of it would be appreciated. But a damaged drawband, or even missing, is also accepted. The mainspring, however, must be functional.

- Escapement mechanism: Complete; exemplars with an escapement that has broken gears or missing parts will not be accepted. Exemplars with not working escapements due dirt or gunk, as long their integrity remains intact, can be accepted. 

- Carriage Width: Nothing larger than 14 inches (120 characters). 

- Scales condition: Irrelevant; intact, missing, damaged, any is accepted, as long the frames that hold them are not missing or critically damaged. 

- Platen and rollers condition: Functional; hardening and cracks are accepted as long they do not compromise the intended

Parts » WTB: Royal 440 parts » 20-6-2020 15:38:07

Argio
Replies: 1

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UPDATE
I have acquired a pair of metallic ribbon spools.
I also need a pica 13" paper lock scale for a Royal Standard.The little rolls are not necessary as I have a pair.

I will keep this parts list updated, consider it active until I comment that I have acquired all the parts I need. 

Standard Typewriters » CPR on a dead Underwood » 19-6-2020 17:07:44

Argio
Replies: 8

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Pretty much what Uwe said, but also adding some details about my experience with electrolysis. I have used electrolysis to remove rust from the panels of an old Underwood SS, among some other large pieces of metal, personally, I would not recommend it if it is your first time with electrolysis or don't have the proper tools or implements. Here some considerations:

* The paint will be ruined, so be ready to do a full paint job. This by itself is a problem if you want to respect the original aesthetic of the machine according to it's age. The old black shinny ones and the wrinkled ones are the hardest, specially the later; the late 50's, and later plain paint jobs are easier to replicate/restore. 

* There will be a nasty goo all over the metal. Nothing a brush and some cleaning agent can't fix, but it will be messy.  

* There will be no paint and no filth. The bare metal will be as clean as it never has been, let's consider it is a complex mechanism (think in the segment and all the inner levers that make the machine work. Though the idea sounds fantastic, it also is a problem that leads to the old, and well known, question of "should I oil my typewriter?" You see, as clean it could be, it is also VERY vulnerable to rust and it will rust, fast. Personally I would use a really light lubricant for the sake of protection to the inner mechanisms, but consider this also might lead to the problem of catching dust and eventually jamming the machine. If you know the right oil or the proper way to avoid a quick rusting and/or the accumulation of dust, go ahead.  

* Is not only steel and iron. Nickel, copper and tin can also be found in the standard Underwood (at least in my experience). Consider that the nickel plating can be damaged and the chemical byproducts of the electrolysis can be a hazardous by themselves. This also brings back the matter of the paint, have you considered it's chemical composition?, the paint of back then is pretty much hazardous compared to o

Electric Typewriters » A comparative (question) about the IBM Model D » 30-5-2020 18:26:44

Argio
Replies: 9

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Thank you for the article, proportional spacing sounds like a very interesting feature for a typewriter, speaking for the executive ones of course. Reading a good opinion about the touch and other features is also helpful.  

Electric Typewriters » A comparative (question) about the IBM Model D » 28-5-2020 19:07:23

Argio
Replies: 9

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I was also considering also an IBM model C if I cant find the model D, then I would consider the Olympia, and then an Adler. Thank you for the advice about the Olympia, I will have it pressent if I ever come across with the opportunity to acquire one.

Electric Typewriters » A comparative (question) about the IBM Model D » 27-5-2020 16:05:30

Argio
Replies: 9

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Those machines look sturdy, I would take only a minimised controlled risk, being with someone that could transport it safely or a seller that could provide a safe shipping (I am aware it could be a bit expensive), but this only if I buy online. 

I have seen some old IBM model C machines laying around at my faculty, I would not be surprised to find a Model D if I ask in the right places or to the right people.  

I must agree about the recommendations, specially the Olympia in my case (but that is just because I really like the SG3 aesthetic).  Also, it is somewhat a relief that your experience repairing your machines was straightforward. Definitively I will consider the Olympia SGE50 and the mentioned Adlers as immediate options, just in case acquiring an IBM becomes way too hard.
 

Electric Typewriters » A comparative (question) about the IBM Model D » 26-5-2020 22:15:21

Argio
Replies: 9

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Thank you for your insight Tom, it is most useful and appreciated. If the opportunity ever comes, I will try to get a working IBM Model D, even tho it sounds like a compromise due it's rarity, it also seems to be more easygoing than a Selectric. Of course, a plan for the future. 

Meanwhile I will be reading the AMES manuals of the 70's, for both standards and electrics. It is so nice to find the specific tools required by typewriter brand, handy without a doubt.
 

Electric Typewriters » A comparative (question) about the IBM Model D » 25-5-2020 14:06:11

Argio
Replies: 9

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Although in someway related to "repairing typewriters", I don't have a specific machine to repair. However this can be considered as a magnificent opportunity to share your thoughts and admiration for the marvellous ingenuity of the IBM typewriters.

I have come to the conclusion that the current life expectancy of a typewriter depends in how easy, or complex, is to repair, the compatibility of pieces with other models (same manufacturer most of the times), how common was the model (therefore a higher chance to cannibalise a ruined machine), and how robust was the design. Considering the aforementioned, there is a typewriter model I would like your opinion in how well built were they, how easy or accesible are they to repair, and if spare parts are easy to find. 

The machine I am interested is the IBM model D. My comparison point is my IBM Selectric III. 
 
As we all know, there is plenty of documentation and spare parts for the different Selectric iterations, however they are also well know for the myriad of problems they can get, some require frequent attention or adjustments, some problems are terminal, some require the replacement of pieces, and others may require knowledge and tooling way more specialised than most of the users possess(I am looking at you, clutch pulley... among other parts).

How does the Model D compares to the Selectric in these aspects? Is built to last, or is it also known for requiring frequent attention, adjustments or replacement of parts?, in case a replacement is needed, is it a procedure complex enough that would have to resort to professional help? 

Thank you in advance

P.D. 
No, I don't know how to change the clutch pulley of a Selectric, nor I would dare to do so, for the time being. 

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