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Maintenance & Repairs » underwood number 5 restoration » 10-10-2019 05:55:05

steini
Replies: 14

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I personally think you are heading the wrong way: taking apart a rusty machine to achieve a smoother movement of the keys it is not a good idea, specially when you don't know what are you doing. WD40, whale blubber, pig fat, olive oil or vaseline in the key mechanism and segment will do wonders and make it smooth for a while, you don't need to take apart anything. If anybody thinks that "will ruin the typewriter" weeeeell, to fiddle with screws, springs, take apart stuff with no experience, can also ruin the machine, permanently. In the case that a rusty machine should be cleaned for a smoother typing action all the typebars, the springs, the links, the segment... would need to be taken apart and all rust removed, maybe bent parts straighten, maybe new springs installed... I don't think you can do that, and I don't think you need to do it either, since you don't need a totally functioning machine. Then why on earth you want to take apart the machine?? you are clearing the way to what? me no understand.  

Maintenance & Repairs » underwood number 5 restoration » 16-9-2019 15:11:10

steini
Replies: 14

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That's right, we all start experimenting, and some of us we have messed up one or two typewriters trying to learn, well, at least me. The beginner instinct tell us to take apart the typewriter, the carriage, whatever is on the way... in order to clean it, and that turns out to be a big no no, in most of the cases.

I have never cleaned a rusty Underwood 5, but many times it is enough some 100% alcohol, ear buds, a brush and patience to make them work smoothly, this seems to be an extreme case, so for extreme cases extreme solutions.

Is wd40 such a crime? with time it tends to gum up the mechanism together with accumulated dust. Yes. I would avoid it in a clean machine, but if is going to be used to free some rusty parts then is great. Then you can always clean it away with white spirit and compressed air...

I would definitively start taking pictures on how you took it apart just in case, or get a twin typewriter to see how it should go, like IanJ ;)

In any case, that typewriter seems to be a piece of cannon fodder to me, I doubt that anything smooth will come out from it, but you can practise and learn from it. I am not sure what kind of art is going to make, so maybe is just fine to throw some wd40 to it, but that is just my opinion.
 

Maintenance & Repairs » underwood number 5 restoration » 15-9-2019 06:35:38

steini
Replies: 14

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Ok, a rusty typewriter can give a smooth action. As long as the moving parts are not rusty. If the goal is not restoring it, but to have it more or less moving for some sort of art, then just use a can of WD40, spray it on the segment and on the key-links and voila, a "perfectly running" typewriter. I think if you attempt anything more complicated than that you might end up with missing screws, taking apart things that you wont be able to put together again... if a typewriter is taken down by a person that has no idea what is doing has a biiiiig chance of not been rebuilt again, or not been as fine tuned as before. 

Maintenance & Repairs » underwood number 5 restoration » 14-9-2019 19:57:11

steini
Replies: 14

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Oh boy, that is a rusty machine there! I think you might need to have some serious skills to get that machine working smoothly! and that if all the pieces are there... I think is quite a challenge to start restoring a machine in that state if is your first project, but good luck! 

User manual 

Repair manual
 

Maintenance & Repairs » Olivetti Lettera 22 » 31-8-2019 09:48:23

steini
Replies: 6

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Hi Bobarto. the first suggestion would be to learn the names of the parts of a typewriter. That would help a lot in order to understand what you mean. By the "return key", do you mean the carriage release lever? (there are two on the top of the carriage, one on the right end and another in the left end). If so, it should work like this: if you push it the carriage is free to move, and of course will go to the left, because the carriage supposed to do that. Try this: just hold the carriage with the hand while you push the release lever, and then you can freely move it, left or right, when you have it in the place you want it release the finger from the carriage release lever and it should stay there. If still goes to the left then you might have missing the spring that brings back the carriage release lever to its original position. The "small top left switch" it could be the carriage lock? maybe. The keys and the space bar don't make the carriage move? occasionally? moslty don't? ummm well, I would start cleaning the machine. A lot of malfunctions on typewriters come from sticky mechanisms with old oil and dust, use some alcohol or turpentine (be careful with the paint in the body with this last one) and clean the machine with a brush, ear buds... In any case, if you don't know what you are doing I would take it to someone who knows how to repair and service typewriters. If you don't have access to anybody, then you will always have internet ;) learn, practise and try not to force or bend any parts, if you are taking apart anything make a video or take pictures on how was done so you can build it back ;) good luck and lets see if you can fix it! 

Maintenance & Repairs » Underwood Universal 1936-Spacebar Stops Halfway along Carriage » 29-8-2019 13:24:13

steini
Replies: 4

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My shoot would aimed to some malfunction in the carriage lock, seen that the carriage stops just when it hits the centre of the machine.In the left corner of the machine on the rails of the carriage a moving part that you can fiddle with, maybe is the spring broken? can you move that part with the finger and make the carriage move past the centre?

Portable Typewriters » Groma Kolibri vs Olympia SM9 vs Olivetti Lettera 32 » 18-7-2019 10:02:30

steini
Replies: 26

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Oh boy, Iceland is not really big on the typewriter market... there are few machines and prices are high. In the positive side I have no other typewriter collector around, so I get most of the ones that I am interested (and affordables) and I leave the rest for the decoration market and rich people!  

Having such high shipping prices makes prohibitive to buy anything in the international market so I just have what I can buy locally, and a couple of typewriters that I brought from abroad on my luggage! So any exchange offer will be welcome!

Help me build a collection!

Portable Typewriters » The Olivetti Studio 45 Commands Respect » 30-6-2019 08:18:16

steini
Replies: 4

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Ah! an undercover Olivetti Valentine! This particular one is made in Ivrea, Italy, I guess that makes it more valuable (joke!). 

Portable Typewriters » The Olivetti Studio 45 Commands Respect » 29-6-2019 17:51:15

steini
Replies: 4

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I like this! more and more ultra fashionable models fetching astronomic prices, this is the only way ;) Getting the ugly ducklings seems to be an alternative to the typewriters that are priced like "I saw it for sale in Ebay for 600 dollars so it has to worth at least 400". Or as someone said in this forum, 200 dollars is a reasonable price... I personally don't feel attracted to plastic bodies, if anybody does, but we are talking about typing machines and if they do the job, then is fine. If is for collecting purposes then I rather go for a rare typewriter for 200 dollars rather than pay it for a machines that is produced by the millions! Thanks for sharing this machine, I will keep my eyes open for it. If I had to add something about the plastic body Olivetties I do have a Olivetti Dora that is pretty good typer as well, very flat, basket shift, and comfy to type on, nothing like the sturdy feeling of a heavy metal body of a 22 or a 32, but still just fine with it for a fraction of its "market price". 

[img]https://i.ibb.co/ns8CCyK/MG-8752.jpg
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Type Talk » Is paying for a restored typewriter worth it? » 23-6-2019 08:53:23

steini
Replies: 5

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I wouldn't trust an ebay add, claiming to be restored. I would ask at least what is the type of restoration it has undergone, is the rubber in the platen new? are feet new? is the mechanism spotless and absolutely clean? is it all original?  there are people in internet that sell "fully restored by qualified technician" machines that are just cleaned. If you have lots of money then go to a reputable seller of refurbished typewriters, and if you have time just search and search until you find a Hermes 3000 in good condition for cheap, in internet, in thrift stores... and then have it restored if you want to spend money on it. But to be honest this model is absurdly overpriced so I wouldn't call it "gambling on eBay", I would just call it "getting scammed for a good typewriter" or "getting scammed for a bad typewriter", but in any case getting scammed, absolutely ridiculous prices! 

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