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Portable Typewriters » Morse 900 » 08-9-2021 16:16:32

Fleetwing
Replies: 3

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Anyone know about these? I understand they are a rebranded Nippo. but I know nothing about those either. Was Morse a store label? Someone has one listed on Craigslist locally. Thanks.

Portable Typewriters » New Baby » 18-2-2020 08:58:48

Fleetwing
Replies: 5

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I realize that I type with only my index and middle fingers, and usually only space with my left thumb, not the right. Never took a typing class. But it works for me.

Type Talk » New Member Thread » 17-2-2020 15:11:16

Fleetwing
Replies: 936

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Welcome! Some nice machines you have there! You do "need" an Olympia SG1 or SG3 also -- but I completely understand the suspicious look from your wife!

Maintenance & Repairs » 1952 Underwood SS, Fracture » 17-2-2020 15:08:32

Fleetwing
Replies: 6

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J-B Kwikweld is another product to look for -- two-part epoxy that works on metal. I figure it should be available in Alberta. You may want to take your machine to a hardware store and ask their opinion on the best product to use and best way to prep the cracks and apply the product. Good luck with this!

Portable Typewriters » Olympia SM3 arrived today » 17-2-2020 15:00:26

Fleetwing
Replies: 1

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I think you will be amazed, as I was when I got mine, at how smooth everything is and at the level of precision in the mechanism (and typed product). Looking forward to hearing your impressions!

Type Talk » Recent Acquisitions Thread » 17-2-2020 14:57:19

Fleetwing
Replies: 1876

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Guess what -- I found the serial number. It was stamped underneath the carriage, on the right side of the machine, on the outside of a frame piece that attaches to the rear frame. Slide the carriage to the left and hold the right side of the machine close to a good light source, and you should see it in a cutout of the body shell, right behind the carriage track. 2561684 -- no idea what year that would be, though I'm guessing later 1970s.

Finally got to type with it some, and it has a surprising and welcome refinement to it -- there is a tabulator brake mechanism. Very smooth, and something I'm used to finding only on Olympia portables. It has power spacing too, which is a "nice to have" also. Seems like a quality typewriter -- heavier duty than an SMC Classic or Galaxie, or Royal Safari, to name two roughly contemporaneous machines. 

Maintenance & Repairs » Help with Olivetti Studio 44 » 12-2-2020 12:04:27

Fleetwing
Replies: 4

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I don't have a Studio 44 anymore, and the one I had didn't require any alignment (this is the "motion" adjustment you're describing -- getting upper- and lower case letters level on the typing line). But -- and I hope this doesn't sound obnoxious -- are you sure those screws are the right ones? I would look for screws that come into contact with some sort of surface that limits the motion of the segment in the shifted and nonshifted positions. Do those screws you're adjusting seem to control those limit settings? Again, I don't have this machine to inspect, but I would look for adjusting screws on the underside of the machine, rather than on the carriage.

Portable Typewriters » Hermes 3000 or Olympia SM3? » 10-2-2020 12:23:51

Fleetwing
Replies: 13

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I guess the Hermes is more valuable from a collectability standpoint, particularly the rounded (first) version. Olympia made a lot of SM3s. I've relatively recently gotten a Hermes and I agree, it's a nice machine indeed. Nice typing feel. But the same can be said of the SM3 -- and it's a faster typer I think, and its precision and solidity is pretty hard to beat.

I think the main question to decide is whether you like the feel of the basket shift (Hermes) or the carriage shift of the SM3. I do find that the shifting of the SM3 is a little too heavy for my taste. I know that can be adjusted to some extent, but I haven't tried it.

The Hermes also has keyset tabulation, while the SM3 requires you to manually set the tabs on the back. If you rarely use tab settings then this isn't much of an issue. (The SM4 has a keyset tabulator, in case you're interested.)

Type Talk » Recent Acquisitions Thread » 06-2-2020 16:34:05

Fleetwing
Replies: 1876

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Uwe wrote:

Fleetwing wrote:

Nope, no serial number that I can see. Maybe it's blocked behind the shell, but as noted above, that wouldn't make sense.

Given your experience, if you can't find one it's possible that there isn't one. I've read reports from a number of collectors who couldn't find a serial number on their Studio 46 either. I'm sure there's an explanation for this. Could it be that Olivetti used serial number stickers like can be found on some Japanese machines for some of the Studio 46 production run? Could those stickers - if that was the case - have been removed or fallen off over the years? Could the fact it was made in Spain have any bearing on all of this?

You may be spot on here -- I believe there's a rectangular indentation in the middle of the bottom plate that's about the right aspect ratio for a serial number sticker. Might have fallen off; there's no residue of an adhesive, though.

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