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Typewriters - Private Sellers Only » WTB: Royal 10 with 'QX' serial number prefix » 07-4-2017 11:45:50

T1peM0nkey
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I am interested in purchasing a Royal 10 typewriter with the 'QX' serial number prefix. Such a machine should date to the early 1920s and may have sound deadening. Condition does not matter much to me at this point; I'm just looking to procure one.

The World of Typewriters » Typewriter movie! California Typewriter! » 07-4-2017 11:34:36

T1peM0nkey
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I got to see California Typewriter at the Cleveland International Film Festival on March 29th, and it is pretty good. It's supposed to get a general theatrical release in the U.S. this fall.

Type Talk » Favorite/Least favorite brands » 21-1-2015 22:58:30

T1peM0nkey
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Cool beans, ztyper. My Royals span 1929-1956, the earliest being a P and the latest being an HH. Royals feel surprisingly sturdy and strong, with a solid touch that says 'I mean business'. Even the depression-era Royals feel this way. I highly recommend them.

The machine that threw me off with its tiny keys is no longer in my collection.... it was a gorgeous 64 Adler Tippa. The other major issue it had was the NOISE. It was loud enough to make your ears ring, no matter what you did with it. I traded that over to Richard Polt, who upon his first keystrokes said "Wow. That's loud." I hear that he has grown to dislike it on noise alone.... and that was why I was sold the machine in the first place! I may buy it back eventually just because it was so gorgeous.

Electric Typewriters » Underwood All-Electric: Thoughts, advice? » 21-1-2015 12:20:31

T1peM0nkey
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Hey all. I'm considering the purchase of an Underwood All-Electric desktop machine since it looks very similar to my Underwood Golden-Touch Standard. What kind of issues did yours have? Any tips on its maintenance? I'm mainly worried about broken plastic parts, the grease, and the electrics... I don't have any experience with electric machines as old as the All-Electric. Any tips and tricks on usage and maintenance would be greatly appreciated.

Off-Topic » What hobbies do you have? » 21-1-2015 11:46:51

T1peM0nkey
Replies: 54

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I have dabbled in model railroading, but I'm more dedicated to amateur radio (callsign KD8UZK), photography and collecting. By this writing I've stashed away Polaroid Cameras, 35mm cameras, Super 8mm cameras, a VHSC camcorder, typewriters of course, telephones, vintage computers, vintage game consoles, VHS tapes, Laserdiscs, Capacitance Electronic Discs, Viewmaster materials, vinyl LPs, vinyl 45s, shellac 78s, cassette tapes, 8-track tapes, CDs, reel-to-reel tape equipment, vintage amateur radio equipment, vintage 'movie' lights, aeronautical and nautical memorabillia. I'd like to get into vintage TVs and Radios, but those are a little our of my price range at the moment. All of these things still work through luck or repair.

The World of Typewriters » Typewriters in the Movies » 21-1-2015 11:24:25

T1peM0nkey
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I have meant to watch Populaire; it looks very interesting. For my family any time a typewriter shows up in  a movie we try to identify it on the spot. It's quite fun. The one that took me the longest to identify was the IBM electric in 'Polk County Pot Plane' (also known as 'In Hot Pursuit'), which is my favorite B-movie. I'm ashamed to say that identifying it took a few months.... It was at a strange angle.

Close Encounters of the Third Kind has a deleted scene at a police station with a lot of typewriters in it, so if you have a special edition you can probably find the scene. Everyone remembers the Royal 10 from 'Misery' and the Adler Universal 39 from 'The Shining', and I spotted a Remington Portable No.2 in 'The Great Gatsby' (2013).

Movies aside, the video game Bioshock has many typewriters hidden throughout the game. All of them are identical to Underwood No.5 desktops and are rebranded 'Belowtree'.

Type Talk » Favorite/Least favorite brands » 21-1-2015 11:13:19

T1peM0nkey
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I like Royals for the same reason that JustAnotherGuy does. My second favorite so far is Underwood, but that is without too much experience with the brand.... third has to be Smith-Corona. These things said, I have had virtually no experience with Olympia or Hermes machines which I suspect I'll like very much.

Type Talk » New Member Thread » 15-1-2015 23:33:59

T1peM0nkey
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I've made a few posts already, but here goes.

I'm T1peM0nkey. My family got our first typewriter in 2002, when my great-grandfather-in-law died and we cleaned out his house. Of the items retrieved from his residence, the one that would make the biggest impact in our lives almost a decade later was a grey Underwood Finger-Flite Champion. As a little kid the machine fascinated me, but in our collective naiveté nobody was allowed to use it because it was 'too fragile; you might break it.' And so it sat for years. 

In that time, I got interested in older things for reasons I don't understand. I think it started with the typewriter and the tin toys we brought back - over those years more antiques arrived either in our house or places I frequented. It didn't help that my dad was part of a group restoring a Lockheed warbird and helping sell a cherry red 60s Ford Mustang. Air and car shows passed, and my interest grew but went nowhere. It was more of a passive interest - "Oh. That's cool," and nothing more.

Then one day a record player came in the mail. Dad broke it out and went to work converting his old LPs to a digital format, a process called 'ripping'. I sat and watched the records spin, listened to the crackles, pops, and the repeating scratches from decades previously, and it clicked in my head that it was really neat. I expressed my desire to get a typewriter for my birthday after we passed an 80s wedge in a Goodwill.

On my birthday 10 months shy of a decade since the Underwood became a display piece, I got the wedge I had seen in Goodwill for my birthday. In the immortal words of my dad that day on Facebook: "One of the things Ian really wanted for his birthday, a typewriter. Whatever ;-)". It was a dark grey Smith-Corona SL-500 H-series wedge - and I loved it. Within the week I went back to the Goodwill and bought the one that had been sitting next to it. Then my brother got one, because monkey see monkey do. And my other brother got one.

I got my first ma

Standard Typewriters » Help Solve a Mystery - SX Prefix on Royal 10 Typewriters » 14-1-2015 10:19:54

T1peM0nkey
Replies: 6

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Yes, I am aware of Canadian keyboards carrying both currencies. I should have specified both '$ and £' to make it clearer. We have a Remington in stock that was built in Canada and has a £ key, so that is my frame of reference.

Curiously enough, no SX tens have been recorded so far outside of the United States. The differences from keyboard to keyboard usually deal with the colors used; arrangement of the lower right keys; and the text on the shift, margin release, and tabulator key.

I am interested in tens with the 'S' prefix. A theory has been forwarded that S no longer stands for 'segment' but for 'standard'. By the time the S prefix appears Royal had been calling the ten the 'Royal Standard' for some time.

Standard Typewriters » Help Solve a Mystery - SX Prefix on Royal 10 Typewriters » 13-1-2015 21:04:13

T1peM0nkey
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Typospherians-

I am T1peM0nkey, and I'm new here. Now that that is out of the way, down to the business at hand. 

With the help of other typospherians, I am attempting to solve the mystery of the 'SX' prefix on Royal 10 Standard machines. Since I began my list of machines we have figured out a lot, and I would like to thank the Davis brothers, Mr. Burbano, and Mr. Weil for their assistance in this endeavor thus far. 

We now know the following: 

In the late 1920s Royal dropped the '10' decals from their machines and stopped using the designation in their advertising. They were still known as the '10' as an internal designation in Royal. In 1928 at serial number 1,200,000 'SX' appeared but was not stamped on any machines. 'SX', as far as we can tell, designates 'Segment-Shift Ten'. The reason that SX wasn't stamped on machines when the internal designation came about is because the segmented machines were wide-carriages, and those get the platen size in inches as a prefix. The first 10s to be changed to segment shift were the 18-inch and wider carriage machines starting in 1928 at serial number 1,200,00. In late 1929 the 14-inch carriages went segment at 1,330,000 and then the standard-sized carriage (at the time Royal's standard carriage size was 10-inch) machines were converted to segment toward the end of 1931 at 1,470,000. The 10-inch standard machines didn't need a prefix for size and were stamped 'SX'. 

With that sorted out, I am now trying to pin down specific features of these machines to determine commonality and a closer estimate of when Royal 10s were discontinued. I'm interested in decimal tabulators, keyboard layouts, carriage widths, condition, etc. 

1. Is the machine equipped with a decimal tabulator? If it is equipped with one, there would be a row of keys above the keyboard that say from left to right:" .  1  10  100  1000 ". If so, is the print black on a white background or white on a black background? If there are these keys

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