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Off-Topic » All-Thumbs » 25-1-2017 10:23:58

retro
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I have two 'young people' resident in the house and I have just confirmed that both use both thumbs to txt. I got a rather quizzical look from daughter who asked how else was she was supposed to do it. I sent a txt to my son earlier, the usual message which reads 'please phone it takes me too long to txt you'. I use one finger to txt, takes forever but I just cannot manage to use my thumbs.

Portable Typewriters » Triumph Gabriele 35 » 16-1-2017 13:54:48

retro
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It is an Adler and if you are unimpressed with the J5 then you are unlikely to be impressed with the Gabriele 35. I have Gabriele 25 too, which is the same machine without the touch control and go faster chrome carriage ends. It was voted best buy by Which magazine in 1975. I like mine and I only paid £5 for it. I find it a comfortable and fast machine with a nice smooth carriage but then we are all different and the keyboard might not suit some people.. If you don't like the J5 then I might be best to give the Gabriele 35 a miss.

Type Talk » Backing sheets » 14-1-2017 19:44:02

retro
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I have never come across plastic backing sheets only ones made from cartridge thickness paper and they sometimes came with a pack of typing paper. I bought an Erika 105 which had been owned by someone who taught typing and there were a number of foolscap size backing sheets in the case pocket. They have a scale marked line spaces on the left and millimetres on the right below a dotted line that runs across the page half an inch from the top. I don't think I ever used a backing sheet when typing letters at work since it was usual practice to have two carbon copies only when it was not required to have carbon copies like when producing tabulations did we ever use a backing sheet. The backing sheets that came with the typewriter look a bit fiddly to use and I haven't tried one. I have always just used a normal letter quality thickness sheet for a backing sheet.

Off-Topic » How Much Do You Type? » 14-6-2016 12:10:04

retro
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Pity only six people took part. I wonder if some are using their typewriters for some clandestine purpose they don't want anyone to know about. I always try to use all of mine about once a month or so but then I don't have that many machines to start with. I use a typewriter around four or so times a week, anything from just typing an envelope to writing the odd article.

Off-Topic » On the fecundity of English » 26-4-2016 08:47:24

retro
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Uwe wrote:

retro wrote:

You are not alone there so will somebody please tell me what a 'hipster' is. I did consult the bible of the English language, the Oxford Concise English Dictionary but apparently it is American English. 

"Hipsters" are not a North American phenomenon. KatLondon has shared her views of the hipster situation in England a few times in this forum, so I think it's less a matter of language than whether or not you have a finger on the pulse of current trends. 

retro wrote:

One person, an aunt, who was a great influence on me in my youth spoke and wrote perfect Queen's English and it was not her first language either as she lived in Canada. I am not very good at being politically correct but I believe the correct term is to say she was a native American. I expect I should not therefore say her country was Canada either and I trust that does not offend anybody. 

That was a little confusing because it implied that English isn't the first language of Canadians, which it is. So you're saying is that your aunt is a North American Indian? English may not be native Indians first language, but because of our education system most can speak English as well as any other Canadian, which incidentally is a variation that is much closer to the "Queen's" version than the truncated style used south of us. In short, I'm not surprised that she had a good command of the English language, or that it was a dialect more familiar to you.

Sorry about any confusion. I should have said she was actually a great aunt so must have been born around the same time as my grandparents in the 1890's and was a North American Indian. I had always imagined that she was well educated, certainly better than my state junior school and although she told me a lot about her early life on the reservation I cannot remember school ever being mentioned. She had often written to my father as we

Off-Topic » Desk favourites » 10-4-2016 17:54:26

retro
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beak wrote:

retro wrote:

This particular model has a design fault in the handset cradle; the receiver could easily slip forward and 'unhook' the phone.  The design was soon corrected in the replacement model which is superficially the same.  A nice vintage piece.

Yes it very easy to accidentally unhook the phone. They never replaced mine. Bit late to get one now I suppose.

Off-Topic » On the fecundity of English » 06-3-2016 20:16:42

retro
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beak wrote:

Well, I suppose it's time I owned up; I don't know what people mean when they say 'hipster'.  Is it American for something the rest of us call something else, or a new beast?

You are not alone there so will somebody please tell me what a 'hipster' is. I did consult the bible of the English language, the Oxford Concise English Dictionary but apparently it is American English. I asked my son, a university student but he said he didn't know and my teenage daughter was even less helpful saying they were people who dressed in weird clothes, used typewriters and fountain pens. I am not sure I subscribe to America and England being two nations separated by a common language. One person, an aunt, who was a great influence on me in my youth spoke and wrote perfect Queen's English and it was not her first language either as she lived in Canada. I am not very good at being politically correct but I believe the correct term is to say she was a native American. I expect I should not therefore say her country was Canada either and I trust that does not offend anybody.
 

Off-Topic » Desk favourites » 17-2-2016 16:42:33

retro
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This is my 1960's telephone which I originally had installed in my parent's home and I still use it as the distinctive loud ringing sound saves confusion with the TV and my children's mobile 'phones. The number in the centre of the dial preceded by the telephone exchange Crescent was a lot easier to dial than now. Just dial CRE3236, three letters and four numbers and that was all. The telephone exchanges often had nice numbers like my girlfriend's, a rather apt VAL for the Valentine exchange. For long distance you dialled 100 and the operator would connect you.
The small school handbell on the right is for summoning the offspring to the feeding trough which they dislike intensely and always ensures a quick response. I am tempted to get a dinner gong but I guess there are limits.
http://i952.photobucket.com/albums/ae8/retrotyper/DSCF1863%20crescent%203236_zpso5kfk7r4.jpg

Maintenance & Repairs » What's your favorite way of cleaning crinkle paint? » 21-1-2016 20:02:29

retro
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Uwe wrote:

Isn't toothpaste a mild abrasive? I like the idea of a soft bristle toothbrush - I always have a couple in the toolbox - but not sure about the toothpaste.

Toothpaste is slightly abrasive, I used to use it to clean the chrome on my motorcycle and cars. It was a lot cheaper than using chrome polish and worked just as well. I have always cleaned the letter slugs with methylated spirits and a toothbrush. I have no idea what it might do to the paint finish on a 1930's typewriter but I always used to put a drop of meths in a bucket of water when leathering off the cars after the weekly wash to prevent any water marks. It certainly didn't seem to do any harm to the Rolls Royce or the Bentley I had to clean every Sunday morning in my youth. I always use a non abrasive polish, Simoniz Original, probably the hardest car polish to use though but my typewriters are gleaming bright if nothing else.
 

Type Talk » Recent Acquisitions Thread » 19-11-2015 09:33:53

retro
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My latest acquisition arrived last Friday the 13th, not a good omen for the superstitious perhaps. Not sure that I really wanted it but I find it difficult to resist a bargain although I was concerned nobody else seemed to be interested in it. It arrived some days earlier than expected and I was rather surprised it arrived at all. One pound bids on Ebay have a habit of not arriving as I know only too well from experience. It was packaged in nothing more than a plastic bag and as the courier from those careful people at My Hermes handed it to me I could see several tears in the plastic bag and felt the typewriter moving about in its case. With camera ready to take pictures of some second hand typewriter parts I opened the case and found it had been put in the case upside down. Surprisingly, it was still in one piece. The bad news was that the carriage only moved a short distance and the carriage lock was already unlocked. I turned the machine over to see if I could find out what was wrong but I hadn't got a clue what I should be looking for and then putting it down again I found that the carriage worked just fine. In fact everything works fine, it is a very clean machine and even the ribbon was in good condition. I now have three Erika typewriters which is getting a bit excessive. It is surprising though what you can find on Ebay mid week like a previous one in Vintage Clothing ending in the early hours "old tipp ritter, in good nick a real steal" opening and only bid was 99p, mine. It was too especially as it included postage! Not everybody wants a rather tired plastic Smith Corona. It has provided me with hours of fun and will shortly be a "freebie" in the private sales when it have done a photo shoot with it.

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