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Type Talk » Recent Acquisitions Thread » 19-3-2017 10:44:18

verhaden
Replies: 1978

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Underwood 450 - http://imgur.com/a/v10nO

Ribbon selector linkage was unconnected and the previous user put the Olivetti spool nuts on upside down, but otherwise in great condition. Only took a few minutes to fix and the text imprint quality is amazing. First and probably only plastic bodied machine, but it's hard for me to pass up a Lettera 32 in any form.

Also picked up another Hermes 3000 (no pictures yet). Smells like cigarettes so I've stripped all the felt out, cleaned up the case, and hit it all with some Ozium. Only other problem with it is that when I use the shift key everything gets stuck down, and won't release without using your finger to push it back up. Can't see any missing springs, bent linkages or obstructions. Cleaned it up with mineral spirits. We'll see where it is in a few days...

Type Talk » Post Editing Now Available! (Disregard for now...) » 24-2-2017 14:02:48

verhaden
Replies: 23

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Made a post in the "Parts" section late last night (00:15:47). Was able to edit it just now (14:01:05). Considerably longer than 15 minutes.

Typewriter Paraphernalia » What kind of paper are you using? » 24-2-2017 09:35:58

verhaden
Replies: 65

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I use 6x9" sheets from Mead's Plain Writing Tablet (70104) for my journal. I like the 2:3 aspect ratio, and since most of my typewriters are 11-12cpi, I usually end up with 55 characters per line. If I want to write letters, this paper folds neatly into your average envelope.

It's cheap, unfancy paper, but it works.

Parts » WTB: Olympia SM Right Margin Stop » 24-2-2017 00:15:47

verhaden
Replies: 0

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I recently acquired a rather nice Olympia SM3, perfectly functioning (with an elite italic typeface!) in every respect except for one: I can't set the right margin. Or rather, I can set the margin, but it doesn't do me any good.

Looking into the carriage, I noticed that the right margin stop looks to be missing (not broken, missing -- the two screws aren't even there) a small piece of metal that attaches on the back and hangs below the stop. This bit of metal is the thing that actually catches the center block and hits the little arm that dings the bell.

Much obliged if anyone has a spare parts machine they're willing to cannibalize. Thanks!

Photo from the underside looking up:

Maintenance & Repairs » For the love of God!! How is platen recovered??? » 13-4-2016 10:44:51

verhaden
Replies: 18

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Many models feature platen diameter at the top of their respective brand pages.

Olivetti     Platen Diameter   Model Diaspron 82, Lexikon Electric, Studio 44, M20, M40, Lexikon 80: 1.622" (41.2mm)
Model Studio 42: 1.429" (36.3mm)
Model MP1, Lettera 22: 1.259" (32mm)24
 

It actually doesn't list the measurement for the Lettera 32, but the listed diameter for the 22 matches.

Maintenance & Repairs » For the love of God!! How is platen recovered??? » 13-4-2016 06:28:37

verhaden
Replies: 18

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I replaced the platen on one of my Lettera 32's. Typewriter Database says it should be 32mm thick. I bought some A82 Shore neoprene tubing with an OD of 1.25" to slide over the platen core. However, the ID of the tube was too big for the core (1" v. 0.9333" or so), and I had to buy heat shrink tubing to bulk up the core diameter. Ended up using two layers, but could have gone with three.

Worked out well enough. It's much quieter and the type impressions are a little richer. Cost of everything shipped was <$30.

Tried to source metric rubber tubing from Aliexpress and other foreign sites, but didn't have any luck finding anything comparable.

Portable Typewriters » Nekkid-Riter » 11-4-2016 12:38:13

verhaden
Replies: 4

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I'm actually doing the same thing with my Hermes 3000 and for, roughly, the same reasons. I bought it without the front protection plate, but the carriage would get locked up, the space bar didn't actuate properly, keys were sticky, etc. I had the metal green shell removed for weeks while I found time to tinker with it.

And when I got it all fixed and put back together, it looked a bit silly without the top cover. So I stripped it down again. My non-typewriter friends are very intrigued by it.

Standard Typewriters » SG Owners Club » 10-4-2016 20:03:09

verhaden
Replies: 281

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Uwe wrote:

You answered your own question: the decimal tabulator. I can't stress how nice it is to have an SG1 with the paper rest; because it's adjustable, you can set it for your paper length and thereby know in advance how close you are to the bottom edge of the page.

Unfortunately, the SG1 with the paper rest sold before I was able to get to it. Ended up with the Super de Luxe instead. It's in pretty decent condition -- minor rust on the chrome(?) parts, no dust on the inside -- and the type impression is excellent. Going to address one or two sticky keys later this week.

For such a big machine, it sure has a small typeface -- about 12cpi. I like how easy it is to remove the carriage (12").

Serial number comes in at 7-202791 -- which would put it between 1957-1958 if I'm reading the Typewriter Database correctly. Any significance to the "7.6" superscript to the left of the "Super de Luxe"?

Standard Typewriters » SG Owners Club » 29-3-2016 09:41:28

verhaden
Replies: 281

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There are two Olympia SG1's for sale in my area: one is a De Luxe and the other is a Super De Luxe. They're priced about the same, but the De Luxe has the plastic paper holder intact.

Anybody know what advantages the Super might have to offer over the other model, otherwise? It has a decimal tabulator, but I really don't care about that.

Type Talk » New Member Thread » 22-3-2016 12:47:06

verhaden
Replies: 993

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I bought my first typewriter a little over a year ago. I was looking for an Olivetti Lettera 32 to keep a journal and write short stories with. Cormac McCarthy used one, so I assumed it was a decent place to start. My options locally were non-existent or overpriced -- and they were all beat up Royals and Underwoods anyway. Craigslist proved equally fruitless, so I decided to take a look on eBay.

Wow! I wasn't about to spend $120+ on a typewriter, especially my first one. So I decided to research a few other typewriter models and discovered all the notable typewriter blogs and the rest of the Typosphere. I then created a list of 3 different models that were appealing and started looking for a deal...

I ended up purchasing an Olympia SM9 for $30 shipped. It was an "Or Best Offer" situation on a typewriter that was listed with one photo, a wide carriage and a four paragraph warning about the machine being "as is" and not wanting to deal with "picky" and "fussy" typewriter collectors.

To my relief, I received the machine in great condition. In fact, it's the only machine I own that hasn't required treatment with mineral spirits, PB Blaster, an air compressor or minor "forming". I gave the case a wipe down with bleach wipes, cleaned up the shell with some Dawn, and installed a new ribbon. I think it was made in 1967(?) and is still the best feeling typewriter I own.

Until about a month ago, the Olympia SM9 was the only typewriter I owned. Then, after a string of interesting coincidences (Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon?) I came to own five more machines, including two Lettera 32's (which I had wanted all along).

1) Olympia SM 9 (1967?, W. Germany) - Standard typeface, 11cpi. Solid base, great touch. Of all my machines, if I had to write a 1,000 page novel, this would be the one to do it on.

2) Olivetti-Underwood 21 (1963?, Barcelona) - Techno typeface, 11cpi. Put a purple ribbon on it and the type impression is amazing. Rich, full and no fading whatsoever. Too bad it's s

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