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Early Typewriters » Remington Standard 6 a good buy? » 11-10-2015 21:25:49

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If you keep looking, you'll find one eventually. Heck, you might even find a better one!

Standard Typewriters » 1948 Royal KMM restore/? » 11-10-2015 21:07:03

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LOL. Thank you everyone for your replies.

I'm familiar with 3-D printing technologies, though I must admit I wasn't aware that metal 3-D printing is starting to become MUCH more affordable. Previously, I had only seen 3-D plastic printing setups that were financially accessible for hobbyists. Still, with it costing up towards $1,000 for a decent 3-D metal printing setup, it's not exactly what I'd call "inexpensive". Especially when a parts machine in poor condition can supply the CORRECT and ORIGINAL parts for $5 to $50. You are right, 3-D printing is becoming less and less expensive, but it's not a magic solution and does have some limitations, though many of those limitations may be reduced over time as the technology continues to improve. I'll give ya that ;-) 

The experience of repairing an old broken machine is most certainly a thrill. Just this week I purchased a 1930s countertop peanut vending machine with a faulty coin mechanism, and after diagnosing the problem, was able to get it repaired by slightly adjusting the mechanism, and replacing a missing spring. I also added a reproduction decal to the globe (originals simply aren't available). It looks great and works great now, and it's completely awesome bringing it back "to life". Again, as I stated earlier, I have quite a bit of experience tinkering and repairing old machines ranging from vintage/antique firearms to 1970s/80s computers, so my opinions are backed by that experience. Most of those collecting fields also have a fairly healthy market for parts salvaged from other items that aren't economical to repair. Parts scavenging isn't a sin, and in my experience, it has actually proven to be very healthy for the respective field.

I actually DO use my vintage typewriters. I guess I'm just a bit more selective on what I buy, the historical accuracy of the machine itself (I'm a history nut), and what work I'm willing to perform on the machines I choose to purchase. 

For me, if I'm going to invest hund

Standard Typewriters » 1948 Royal KMM restore/? » 11-10-2015 01:51:13

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Meh... guess it all comes down to whether or not you like restored typewriters with non-original replacement parts. I simply avoid machines in poor condition and needing major replacement pieces. I would never buy one that had a space bar made from printed plastic. Also, 3-D printing isn't a good option for some important mechanical applications in typewriters.

I hope members here realize there is no need to come to some sort of agreed consensus on this... I was simply presenting my viewpoint. Neither of us are wrong, just different ways to approach the hobby. My viewpoint has been formed from about 15 years of buying, selling, and collecting  typewriters. During that time I have found it is best to focus on the nicest machines possible. In any antique collecting genre, you will hear the same advice. So by all means disagree with me, just as long as you are enjoying your typewriters as you see fit. 

I'd love to see someone perform a complete restoration on the KMM that is the topic of this thread. Then, post a summary of the total hours and monetary costs involved with completing the restoration. I am thinking it would be a great way to provide a reality check for anyone considering doing something similar.

Portable Typewriters » Royal Quiet De Luxe » 10-10-2015 23:24:03

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theoldman wrote:

Did my best to clean this one up. Not bad for $35. Considered removing the sticker but I'm afraid it will not go well. At least the office supply company from that time period was located in my home town.

It would be a shame if you removed that decal. It looks awesome, and helps tell the history of this typewriter. 
 

Standard Typewriters » 1948 Royal KMM restore/? » 10-10-2015 23:04:42

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Sorry, 3-D printed plastic parts and cast resin components simply aren't acceptable in my opinion. Who on earth would want to restore their all-metal turn-of-the-century typewriter with parts that are modern fabrications made of plastic? Your approach is great in theory, but in my opinion impractical in practice. What do you expect, for other collectors to store these dilapidated machines away until some unknown point in the future when it's possible to practically utilize 3-D printing and other fabrication methods? Furthermore, how are you going to do this if the parts are heavily worn, broken, or missing? Also, typewriters are composed of a massive number of little leaf and coil springs (which are one of the most common failure points in a typewriter), which can't be fabricated with the methods you listed. Let's be practical here... I am 100% confident that anyone who invests the time and money to restore a machine like the OP's KMM will SERIOUSLY think twice about ever taking on another project of a common mass-produced typewriter in similar condition. Rechroming is very expensive unless you have your own equipment to do it (and the parts on a 1930s typewriter may have some other type of plated finish, such as nickel), and a project with so many heavily rusted and intricate parts will need a COMPLETE tear-down to be done properly (which will involve HUNDREDS of hours of disassembly, cleaning, refinishing, reassembly, and adjustment). Just the cost of high-quality automotive grade paint to refinish this KMM will be more than buying the same model machine in vastly superior condition. 

You keep bringing up things that can be done to repair historically important and valuable typewriters. I don't think a Royal KMM qualifies as such a machine, no matter how cool this particular model may be. My statements here would be vastly different if we were discussing something like an original 19th century Hammond, Yost, Caligraph, Sholes & Glidden, Remington No.1 or 2, etc.

Type Talk » Dealer Stickers » 10-10-2015 01:01:20

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texbodemer wrote:

I have a 1938 Remington with this delightfully gaudy sticker--it's as big as my thumb 

That's actually a really cool looking dealer's sticker. I wouldn't change a thing about it.

I personally leave the dealer/service stickers in place. I actually think they are cool.

Early Typewriters » Remington Standard 6 a good buy? » 10-10-2015 00:53:27

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$150 isn't bad for such an early typewriter if in nice, functional condition. If it's a machine you've been looking for, and you are pleased with the condition, that is a pretty good price.

Standard Typewriters » 1948 Royal KMM restore/? » 10-10-2015 00:49:04

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colrehogan wrote:

 
The blue and purple machines sound really cool! Wish I could find stuff like that around here!

Just keep looking! You'll find them eventually. Heck, just a month ago I found a cursive script Olympia SF for less than $4 at a Goodwill of all places! The fancy colored typewriters from the 1930s are fairly scarce to find "in the wild", but they pop up occasionally. The blue Royal was $30, and the purple one (which was in gorgeous condition with the original case) was $75. Still wish I could have picked them up but I can't complain, as I've found some really clean late 1940s Royal Quiet Deluxes for $10 and under during the last few weeks (and that Olympia SF). 

The one typewriter that keeps eluding me is a super nice 1950s Royal FP. What a gorgeous typewriter!
 

Standard Typewriters » 1948 Royal KMM restore/? » 10-10-2015 00:34:53

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Uwe wrote:

1. It represents a challenge, and not only is there a great sense of personal triumph when bringing back a machine that otherwise would have been broken into parts, but it increases one's knowledge of how that machine works and was built.
2. It helps to maintain the current stock of typewriters left in the world. There are a finite number of typewriters left on this planet, and their population is on the decrease. Who knows how many are being destroyed on a daily basis? Eventually those $50 finds will become few and far between, and more and more of the surviving ones will require restoration or major repair. Turning a typewriter into a parts machine should be an absolute last resort step, and I'm sure that future generations of collectors will be appreciative of those who did spent countless hours restoring their "decrepid (sic) old machines."

LOL. Yeah, I know the arguments supporting such a restoration... in fact, I actually used to engage in such restorations on other items (cars, motorcycles, bicycles, etc.). Eventually, however, I discovered restorations eat up a TON of time and are ALWAYS more expensive overall than simply buying a good item to begin with. Doesn't seem like a good plan to ME, but if others find it to be more enjoyable than I did, then that's awesome. I wouldn't ever impede on anyone else's enjoyment in this hobby, I was just stating my point of view. Everyone should approach the typewriter collecting hobby however they want, I simply find the most enjoyment in searching for them in flea markets, estate sales, etc.

Uwe, you mention that typewriters will eventually need "restoration or major repair". Where do you think parts for repairs are going to come from? Any typewriter is going to need a good source of replacement parts in the future, so there is absolutely no problem in using a machine for parts. Even here at these forums I see an awful lot of "WTB" ads for parts. I'll stand by my statement that partin

Standard Typewriters » 1948 Royal KMM restore/? » 09-10-2015 03:41:24

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I'd strongly recommend moving on and using both of these as parts machines. The parts from these typewriters could possibly keep many other typewriters fully functional for years to come. 

I purchased a similar set (in my case a Royal KMM and an Underwood No.5) specifically to use for parts/spares, and they look MUCH better than what you have. I personally don't understand the desire to invest a bunch of time into a rotted/rusted typewriter, when nice examples can still be found of something like a KMM for under $50. But that's just me. I'd rather use that time for other pursuits... like visiting more estate sales, flea markets, and antique stores in hunt of typewriters that have been well cared for throughout the last 50+ years, and don't need any major work. There are some amazing machines out there. Within the last 4 weeks, I have passed on a couple of 1930s colored Royal portables (a blue model and a purple one), a neat old Halda, several 1930s to 1950s Remingtons, etc., all of which were priced between $20-$75 and fully functional (funds have been tight, otherwise I would have snapped up the blue/purple Royals...). Then again, I enjoy the hunt more than the countless tedious hours spent trying to restore a decrepid old machine...

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