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Portable Typewriters » Newbie - 1947 Smith Corona Sterling » 06-1-2019 14:56:07

CoronaJoe
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I agree with Uwe.  I also have a 47/48 Silent that is in my opinion the best of all my other portables.  After hours of typing averaging 50 wpm,  the Smith seems the most "fluid" and quiet.  I had the spring motor replaced at a repair shop by a tech with close to 40 years in the biz. Rather than ship me parts, I had him do it plus a Clean Lube  & Adjust .  He spruced it up so nicely you couldn't tell I saved it from a barn.  In his opinion they were among the mechanically easier ones to repair and most durable.  One feature you might discover is that their platens are easy to change. There's a slide over the platen's shaft on the carriage right that's moved back, and with the variable released the platen lifts right out.  A selling point , or gimmick however it's looked at, harder platens where available for jobs requiring lots of stenciling or thick copies.  Maybe you know of or remember the 5 or 6 ply carbon copy forms.

Typewriter type comes in two basic forms as characters per inch. Not really a font,  the 10 cpi is called Pica, (the larger), and 12 cpi is Elite, ( the smaller).  I have not found the reason why for different cpi other than just the way the industry evolved.  There are varieties of typeface in Pica or Elite with names for each, and some with cursive available through the years.

Type Talk » Absolute quietest typewriter… » 13-7-2017 22:35:26

CoronaJoe
Replies: 47

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Yes, the Royal Model 10 was a standard or desktop.

Type Talk » Absolute quietest typewriter… » 13-7-2017 15:52:55

CoronaJoe
Replies: 47

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My 2 candidates for quietness would be the Olympia SM9 and the Royal 10.  Both are clean, adjusted, and as far as I know they have the original rubber on the platen.  It seems to me it's more to do with how sturdy the frame is, and the precision and robustness of the moving parts.  There is also padding to some extent.

I've had 2 experienced typewriter techs, one has a repair shop for over 30 years and the other one has a service and platen recovering business, mention that some of the older wood core platens had lead in them for noise reduction.  Royal used this strategy.  If an old platen has bulges in the rubber, it is more than likely the lead has gone or is going to lead oxide. I can't say what  all brands or models used lead, but it seemed to be an industry wide practice before the cores went to metal during the 1950's.

Rubber is a big factor in reducing the familiar clacking.  90 to 92 Shore A was the spec'd hardness and after having some platens recovered; they were quieter at that hardness than the more brittle original covering..

Maintenance & Repairs » Repairing IBM Selectric III » 10-7-2017 01:09:50

CoronaJoe
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There is also an IBM/Selectric group over on Yahoo.  They're a pretty savvy bunch and I believe there are visits from some retired IBM techs and typewriter repair guys.  I'm sure they can help as well.
 
golfballtypewritershop@yahoogroups.com

The World of Typewriters » Typewriters in the Movies » 09-7-2017 22:17:15

CoronaJoe
Replies: 87

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OH, and another thing, spotting can be annoying to spouses or significant others unless you forewarn or at least ask so as to warm them up to it.

The World of Typewriters » Typewriters in the Movies » 09-7-2017 22:14:50

CoronaJoe
Replies: 87

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Besides International Harvester vehicles, now I'm into typewriter spotting   Loved Trumbo, I've seen "Populaire" twice, and recently viewed "Papa: Hemingway in Cuba"  They had his Remington correct from what I've read about writers and their machines.  However, the set pieces for the Miami Globe newspaper's newsroom appeared to be all portables and I was able to make out at least one grey Royal QDL from the 50's.  I'm sure the stage department was on a budget and finding good desk machines might have been daunting.  I don't think reporters preferred portables at work, at least not what you see in film noir or the Daily Planet.

Maintenance & Repairs » Repairing IBM Selectric III » 09-7-2017 21:55:55

CoronaJoe
Replies: 2

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I also have a Selectric lll.  It works pretty good as it only had one owner.  The covers come off pretty easy, or rather the "works" slip out like a cartridge and most of the mechanical components are exposed for cleaning or adjustment, and the belt drive is easy to service.  There are a couple of Youtube vids that show how the cover or casement works.  Other than that, they are complicated to work on and require a precise logical order of adjustment.  The best I can say is that all procedures are systematic; a singular screw up can affect other assemblies that can lead you down a circular path.  My advice is read as much as you can find, there are some repair books on the net such as Ebay and perhaps the 1st time around is to have an IBM fluent repairman tackle it.  Then when you pick it up you might get some insight on it.

Typewriter Paraphernalia » Canned air alternative » 07-7-2017 21:17:22

CoronaJoe
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Javi wrote:

I use an "stolen" air compressor. Got it from my father's farm, rescuing it from a shed where it saw no use at all. 2 hp and 50 litres is excessive for typewriters, but with a good nozzle you can regulate the flow and blow new life into a dirty machine.

Canned air is ultra expensive here, provided you can find it (which is hard), so it's never been an option.

You should be able to adjust the pressure switch to cut out (turn off) the machine at a lower pressure.  I have a small 2 Hp shop air compressor I find that 35-40 psi is fine for any typewriter or small assembly cleaning work such drying off from a solvent dip.  On top of that a regulator plumbed into the outlet for the hose I use on delicate stuff  I have cranked down to 15-20 psi is fine for not blowing things apart.
 

Maintenance & Repairs » Ever seen this? Typebar stops short » 06-7-2017 17:14:31

CoronaJoe
Replies: 6

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Just theoretical at this point.  Try a ribbon and paper; then see if it actually does or does not type a character.

Type Talk » New Member Thread » 05-7-2017 14:06:39

CoronaJoe
Replies: 804

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SirChill wrote:

Hello all, I'm new to the forum.

My name is Charles and I live in Texas, USA. I got into typewriters about a year ago when someone sent me some correspondence typed out on an Olivetti Lettera. It just looked so cool that I had to get a manuel typewriter for myself. I hopped onto craigslist and someone had just posted an 1923 Royal 10 with the split window for $30. I didn't know much about old manual typewriters at the time (I guess I still really don't) but other than being dusty, none of the keys were stuck, the spacebar worked, the carriage moved, and the bell went ding, so I bought it. The typewriter turned out to be in really really good condition and it was the last good find I had here in my area. I've since had the rubber replaced on the platen & rollers, and the Royal 10 is still my main typewriter.
I also have a little gray 1950s Hermes Baby which is in really good shape (aside from the bottom not being grippy enough), and I have a skywriter and 1970s smith corona that both need some work.  Eventually I'd like to track down: a newer Hermes rocket/baby in seafoam green with the longer carriage return lever & ribbon color selector; an early-to-mid 1930s flat-topped Smith Corona Silent in maroon; a Lettera 22; and a Corona 4 in blue or green.
So what drew me into typewriters (aside from creating cool-looking correspondence)? I work as a data analyst, spend a huge portion of my day at a computer, am a heavy user of modern technology, and feel like I just want to unplug occasionally, go with a little old school tech. The typewriter has a great tactile feel and response that lets me do that. Combine the typewriter with using snail mail for letters, and its like I'm "back in the olden days" as my kids would say.

​Congratulations on your Model 10.  It's also my favorite as well.  I agree on the technology thing, it is good to just unplug once in awhile and even a break from the internet is hard but so worth it once you get past the 3rd

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