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Typewriter Paraphernalia » Paper » 15-8-2017 08:53:32

DRH
Replies: 5

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I've been using the blank Rhodia staple top pads for a while and I have to say, the paper is great. It's 21.3 lb high grade vellum made by Clairefontane. It's a little pricey, but made for ink pens. It absorbs ink well without any bleeding. Anyways, I think it's worth a try.

The World of Typewriters » Typewriter Spotting » 26-7-2017 16:38:02

DRH
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Ha, damn, beat me to it.

The World of Typewriters » Typewriter Spotting » 26-7-2017 16:35:43

DRH
Replies: 20

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Royal Portable O with touch control. Considering the bomber jacket and the age of typewriter, I guess the plane is a B-17.

Type Talk » Typeface drawings » 25-7-2017 08:46:25

DRH
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Technical drawings are scaled to to ensure that all the necessary data for producing an object is provided to the manufacturer. In the case of small objects, like a typewriter, drawings are scaled up. In the case of large objects, like a skyscraper, it's the opposite.

I've never seen technical drawings for a typewriter, but it's safe to assume that typeface drawings were part of a set of drawings, each with their own specifications that told the manufacturer not only how to make the individual parts, but how to assemble them properly. There is too much math involved to go over here, but I can imagine that the scale of the typeface drawings had to include precise dimensions and angles in relation to other drawings, like for the carriage or the platen for example, so everything would function properly when they came off the assembly line.

Btw, you got me thinking. I would love to own a set of technical drawings for a typewriter. They would look super dope framed and hung my office. I think I'll keep my eyes open for some.

Type Talk » Absolute quietest typewriter… » 13-7-2017 08:39:46

DRH
Replies: 47

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In my limited experience, the quietest typewriter I've used (and own) is the Olympia Traveller de Luxe S. The type bars produce a soft thud, rather than a clacking sound. There is no padding glued to the inside of the body, but the frame and the components are rock solid, so there is no internal vibration while using. Also, it is heavier than other ultra portables that I've tried. When I got it, I was looking for the smallest machine I could find with all the bells and whistles I wanted, which it has, but upon testing I expressly remember thinking, "damn, this is one quiet machine."

Type Talk » Recent Acquisitions Thread » 09-7-2017 15:41:06

DRH
Replies: 1709

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Very cool. I have to say, I think that the vertical script on the Hammond looks amazing!

Portable Typewriters » Decisions about the White Olivetti Valentine. » 03-7-2017 10:26:29

DRH
Replies: 4

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Can, or have you seen it in person? If not, does the seller seem reputable? (Good reviews, photographs of all angles of the machine and case inside and out, etc.) Was it made in Spain or Mexico? (People seem to prefer the machines made in Spain, but I couldn't really tell you why)

Full disclosure - I own a red Valentine S and enjoy using it. Does it type like a Hermes 3000? Heck no, but mine, at least, types as well as a good ultra-portable. ( maybe that's a bad or vague comparison? I don't know, the only Valentine I've ever used is the one I have)

The price seems right if the machine is in order. If you're buying it to resell it you can probably double your money. I see the rare colors being sold for 600-1,000 - which is insane, plus, I don't think anyone is actually buying them at that price.

As for the condition of the body -- Deep scratches and discoloration are the things to look out for. Those are impossible to fix, unless you are a professional mold polisher. But light, surface scratches can be buffed out no problem with a plastic polish compatible with ABS. Mine had tons of little surface scratches when I got it. I used the Novus polish kit and in a few hours it looked good as new. Light scratches are par for the couse when it comes to the Valentine, especially on the top of the machine due to the direct contact it makes with the case. If you're keeping it for your collection you can solve that problem easy by placing a thin piece of felt with a sticky back inside the case.

Type Talk » On the subject of platen rubber » 03-7-2017 08:42:59

DRH
Replies: 24

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schyllerwade wrote:

On the subject of platens:

If you were to have a platen recoated by, say, jj short, is there any sort of preventative maintenance you could do to ensure it stayed soft over the years?

 
There are a number of rubber care products out there, but also, keeping the machine in a good climate can add many years to the life of the platen, and feet!

Type Talk » On the subject of platen rubber » 03-7-2017 08:36:46

DRH
Replies: 24

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SoucekFan wrote:

DRH wrote:

If you are looking for something to compare a platen to, I would look for something in the 60A to 70A range. Hope that helps

From an earlier post on the subject: "A general purpose platen would originally be rated in the 90-92 range."

 
Yeah, 90 makes good sense to me. I suggested those for a quick comparison to something around the house to get an idea for the "grippy" feel and fingernail test. I have only used rejuvenator, and have never tried to replace a platen at home. I'm not that confident.

Type Talk » On the subject of platen rubber » 01-7-2017 08:13:07

DRH
Replies: 24

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From what I understand, you want to look for three things when it comes to the condition of the platen: 1) it should have a smooth, dark appearance, and not have a dusty white look to it. 2) If you run your finger across, it should have a 'grippy' feel. 3) you should be able to sink your thumbnail into the rubber and it should slowly spring back.

I've had various degrees of success with rubber rejuvenator. But they will, on the surface, restore the original appearance and the 'grippy' feel. It just depends what condition the rubber is in when you get the machine.

But in general, rubber is manufactured in a wide scale of hardnesses by what is called the Durometer scale, or Shore scale (jeopardy question, anyone?)
Shore 20A = Rubber Band
Shore 40A = Pencil Eraser
Shore 60A = Car Tire Tread
Shore 70A = Running Shoe Sole
Shore 80A = Leather Belt
Shore 100A = Shopping Cart Wheel

If you are looking for something to compare a platen to, I would look for something in the 60A to 70A range. Hope that helps

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