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11-4-2016 21:07:12  #21


Re: What It Means to Be an American

I feel like the topic of pride is something that has come up here again and again. In my opinion, I do not feel like pride is something that is that should be suppressed, given that it's not used to snub the other person or to make everyone else feel bad. There is pride in one's achievements, history, and heritage. Saying that you're glad to be who you are, and where you're from is not a bad thing, it can be a driving force to make your world a better place, in return gives you pride in the fact that you have done something beneficial to someone other than yourself. But there is also the "dirty" pride, the kind that you say to lift yourself higher than the rest so you may shine with light of a thousand stars and that you bathe in a shower of a thousand kisses. And between those two kinds of pride is a very fine line.

Am I proud to be an American? Yes, yes I am. Much in the same way I am proud to be from New Jersey (yeah take that! "Armpit of America," pffff, give me a break...). I'm proud of the people that live here, and though we can do better, I think overall it's a nice place and I think you should visit sometime.

JustAnotherGuy had a very good point though, we need to be careful about not labeling ourselves to avoid fencing ourselves and further dividing the world. I too have noticed that, especially among my peers, that we like to keep ourselves in little groups of like-minded people. Now, I think that it's just a high school thing because many adults and teachers have pointed this out, but I can't be sure because I still need to mature and see the world for myself. I sometimes wish I was surrounded by like-minded people all the time. Thinking would be much easier (because there is none) and my opinion would always be repeated back to me, reassuring myself that I am always right. But no, I must always challenge my thought process and I must always listen to others to see their opinion and then form my own from my beliefs and morals. Because believe me, both extremes in my school are unbearable, so I refuse to belong to either even if I used to.

So as a wise sailor once said "I yam, what I yam" and that's the philosophy I follow. I'm proud of who I am, what I do, and what I stand for. I don't belong to any group (besides the label of "typewriter-lover"). If you don't like me, well, then you can go... please reconsider because I want to be your friend. 


A high schooler with a lot of typewriters. That's pretty much about it.
 

11-4-2016 21:12:13  #22


Re: What It Means to Be an American

Boy I wrote a lot...

One more thing I wanted to say, is that I've actually learned a lot about the people of this forum. It's very interesting to see the thoughts and feelings of people from around the world and that we're all open-minded enough to discuss such a charged topic. Perhaps there's a connection between typewriters, and the kinds of people that use them...


A high schooler with a lot of typewriters. That's pretty much about it.
 

12-4-2016 05:31:00  #23


Re: What It Means to Be an American

ztyper wrote:

Boy I wrote a lot...

One more thing I wanted to say, is that I've actually learned a lot about the people of this forum. It's very interesting to see the thoughts and feelings of people from around the world and that we're all open-minded enough to discuss such a charged topic. Perhaps there's a connection between typewriters, and the kinds of people that use them...

Well, I would keep "from around the world" in Perspective. Largest representation here is from the US, followed by Canada, England and Australia. I think we could say "from around the former British dominions". 

I just ordered a typewriter from Kazakhstan, by the way: made in Sarajevo, Cyrillic keyboard, lived  in Kazakhstan, hopefully on its way to NYC on a typewriter visa backed by the full good faith of eBay. Besides exotic locale seller had feedback rating of "3". But it was not much money, I have a hunch it will get here OK, and since eBay backs the sale at most I might be out time and trouble. But what a traveled typewriter.

Did you know that Astana, capital city of Kazakhstan, is the second coldest capital on the planet? I thought not. I think there is a lot we don't know about Kazakhstan! 

But on this topic since all have said "this is very dangerous, but..." and then delivered a full soapbox screed with flying fingers I think I will have to follow suit, but only after a stiff glass of scotch because I just cannot write really good screeds with lots of exclamation points and asterisks stone sober. 


"Damn the torpedoes! Four bells, Captain Drayton".
 

12-4-2016 08:58:32  #24


Re: What It Means to Be an American

Kazakhstani typewriter! Brilliant, keep us posted on that when it arrives. I sometimes see Cyrillic ones on eBay UK but they're always expensive. I do have a couple that came from behind the Iron Curtain though, including a very cute little Consul that rang immediate bells for a friend who grew up in Communist Poland. 

I got my Rheinmetall KsT from an elderly Greek man who was given the machine in 1957 by his cousin, in Greece. It has a UK keyboard but with a dollar sign on one of the 'extra' keys. My Remington Rand came from Argentina in the 1940s. I have an Adler that belonged to an Urdu poet who ran a magazine in the 70s, and an Olympia Progress that belonged to a Jewish writer in Hampstead; hard not to imagine that he was using it against the Nazis in the 30s and 40s...

 

 

12-4-2016 14:50:56  #25


Re: What It Means to Be an American

As far as I know, the only exotic typewriter I own is a Litton Royal 200 made in Japan... I would love a typewriter from, say, India. I know India had its own typewriter manufacturer and not much is known to us Westerners, but I would love to own one anyways. It'd be pretty rad to own a Korean typewriter too. I know they're out there, I'm just not sure where...


A high schooler with a lot of typewriters. That's pretty much about it.
 

13-4-2016 18:10:08  #26


Re: What It Means to Be an American

It's tempting to say, 'In Korea'...

 

13-4-2016 19:37:28  #27


Re: What It Means to Be an American

I've been told that I don't sound like an American by someone in the U.K.  I asked what an American sounds like but they couldn't tell me.


Smith Premier 4 typewriters are cool!
 

13-4-2016 20:09:34  #28


Re: What It Means to Be an American

KatLondon wrote:

It's tempting to say, 'In Korea'

I suspect that he was referring to the Korean-made export models that were produced using Japanese tooling (I think Silver-Seiko was one of the Japanese companies that sold off its production equipment). Some of these models looked very similar to the original Japanese machines, which were very sound designs and performed very well for their price point. 

I've only seen a handful of Korean models for sale over the years in my area, so I can understand why ztyper is wondering where they all ended up. And the only one I own is a Triumph-Adler Junior De Luxe that was made by Dong-Ha Precision; the model is a derivative of the Silver Reed 500, and practically identical to the Royal Safari III - and yet made in Korean. Interesting machines - if you can find one.


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

13-4-2016 21:02:50  #29


Re: What It Means to Be an American

I was actually thinking about a typewriter that can type in Korean. I'm not sure how the Korean language is written, but I assume it's more like Japanese in which it has certain symbols for syllables unlike Chinese which has specific characters for different meanings.

But I never knew that there were Korean-made exports that were Japanese brands that were under the Litton name. That seems pretty cool to me.


A high schooler with a lot of typewriters. That's pretty much about it.
 

14-4-2016 17:05:08  #30


Re: What It Means to Be an American

The Korean version of the Silver-Reed flat portable (made by K-Mec I believe) is a bit different.  The platens are nice and soft (they were always too hard, even from new, on the Japanese ones), but they must have used a different plastic for the keytops because they often break - which the Japanese ones never do.  And yes, I have built a composite machine using the best Japanese and Korean parts !  I even repaired a ribbon lift problem on a Robrotron Cella (same machine made in East Germany on very worn-out tooling) by substituting parts from an older Silver-Reed.  They made this machine in Bulgaria too, as the Maritsa.......

 

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