You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?



14-7-2016 14:09:29  #11


Re: old typewriters

And when the owner of the house/apartment decides to redecorate, what happens to those typewriters? Into the trash, I expect. I have no problem with typewriters as decoration, as long as they don't as a result become disposable, like the cheap IKEA sofa that is no longer in style. Our next door neighbor has an old L.C. Smith (stuck keys from lack of use) sitting in her living room -- an object of curiosity but nothing more than that. I just hope she offers it to me when she decides she is tired of it.

 

14-7-2016 14:24:00  #12


Re: old typewriters

It's a tough call, but I'd much rather see a disused typewriter being kept as decoration than it being tossed in landfill or having its keys chopped. As long as the machine is appreciated and enjoyed, does it really matter whether or not it's actually being used?

I have two friends that each own one standard and have no intention of ever using their typewriter.In one case it's an Underwood that was owned and used by his father, and it's kept as a memento of him. He hopes one day to pass it on to his daughter who took journalism in school. The other guy has a Remington that is displayed along with other period items. He's a serious collector who deeply appreciates the value of vintage items, and enjoys the machine in a different way that we perhaps would. In both cases I provided them with detailed information about their machines, which they were very thankful for. I think they deserve to own these machines even if they don't intend to use them.


"To save time is to lengthen life."
 

14-7-2016 17:17:49  #13


Re: old typewriters

Uwe wrote:

It's a tough call, but I'd much rather see a disused typewriter being kept as decoration than it being tossed in landfill or having its keys chopped. As long as the machine is appreciated and enjoyed, does it really matter whether or not it's actually being used?

I have two friends that each own one standard and have no intention of ever using their typewriter.In one case it's an Underwood that was owned and used by his father, and it's kept as a memento of him. He hopes one day to pass it on to his daughter who took journalism in school. The other guy has a Remington that is displayed along with other period items. He's a serious collector who deeply appreciates the value of vintage items, and enjoys the machine in a different way that we perhaps would. In both cases I provided them with detailed information about their machines, which they were very thankful for. I think they deserve to own these machines even if they don't intend to use them.

Most people, sadly, don't realize the history of these machines and how they helped to shape the business world, as well as communication in general.  In fact, we reminisce more about railroad steam engines, dial telephones, and even radio and black-and-white television sets way more than we do the lowly old typewriter.  But in its day, it was as important as the computer is today.  And because we don't appreciate it as much as we should, it has almost been erased from alot of minds as far as history goes.  It is up to us typewriter collectors to find these old relics, fix them up, give them love and attention they need and deserve, and show the world what it was like before the internet.
 


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

15-7-2016 07:03:22  #14


Re: old typewriters

Uwe wrote:

I have two friends that each own one standard and have no intention of ever using their typewriter.In one case it's an Underwood that was owned and used by his father, and it's kept as a memento of him. He hopes one day to pass it on to his daughter who took journalism in school. The other guy has a Remington that is displayed along with other period items. He's a serious collector who deeply appreciates the value of vintage items, and enjoys the machine in a different way that we perhaps would. In both cases I provided them with detailed information about their machines, which they were very thankful for. I think they deserve to own these machines even if they don't intend to use them.

That´s the case with my uncle. I´ve given him a non-working Underwood 5, and most probably he isn´t going to revive it. But he deeply appreciates the machine. Not only as a present, but as what the typewriter is and means. He´s a mechanic, so he likes this kind of things, and all those little things about the Underwood just make it more valuable for him. Next target: Corona 3.

That´s the good part of typewriter decoration
 


TaktaktataktaktakcluccluctaktaktaktaktakDINGtaktaktaktakCREEEEEEEEECtaktaktak...

(Olivetti Linea 98)
 
 

15-7-2016 13:13:19  #15


Re: old typewriters

TypewriterKing wrote:

Uwe wrote:

It's a tough call, but I'd much rather see a disused typewriter being kept as decoration than it being tossed in landfill or having its keys chopped. As long as the machine is appreciated and enjoyed, does it really matter whether or not it's actually being used?

I have two friends that each own one standard and have no intention of ever using their typewriter.In one case it's an Underwood that was owned and used by his father, and it's kept as a memento of him. He hopes one day to pass it on to his daughter who took journalism in school. The other guy has a Remington that is displayed along with other period items. He's a serious collector who deeply appreciates the value of vintage items, and enjoys the machine in a different way that we perhaps would. In both cases I provided them with detailed information about their machines, which they were very thankful for. I think they deserve to own these machines even if they don't intend to use them.

Most people, sadly, don't realize the history of these machines and how they helped to shape the business world, as well as communication in general. In fact, we reminisce more about railroad steam engines, dial telephones, and even radio and black-and-white television sets way more than we do the lowly old typewriter. But in its day, it was as important as the computer is today. And because we don't appreciate it as much as we should, it has almost been erased from alot of minds as far as history goes. It is up to us typewriter collectors to find these old relics, fix them up, give them love and attention they need and deserve, and show the world what it was like before the internet.
 

It may be that for some people, such as those who have memories of slogging through typing term papers in school "back in the day," a typewriter doesn't exactly conjure up warm memories. Same for those who typed for a living, at least for a while -- the last thing they want to have in their houses is a typewriter. Not everyone has negative recollections, of course, and for some, the length of time that's passed has softened their feelings.  But I can see how a typewriter isn't the same thing for people as, say, their old transistor radio or record player.

 

15-7-2016 16:40:22  #16


Re: old typewriters

Well, you got a point there, Fleetwing.  To some, a typewriter conjures up memories of solid, nothing but hard work, whether it's "slogging through typing term papers in school," or long, hard hours of being in a secretarial pool.  And, yes, to at least most of these people, the last thing they want to have taking up space in their homes is a typewriter.  But I am not speaking for these folks.  I'm talking about those of us who have more fond memories of these machines.  For me, yes, I've done lots of long, hard typing to the point it hurt everytime I sat down, after having done so for hours on end.  But at the same time, the typewriter helped me saved my sanity when I was really young trying to adapt to a world that was very different from me, that expected me to fall in line and be just like it.  Typewriters provided comfort for me on those occasions I needed a crutch and an escape from what I then perceived as an unyielding, unforgiving world.  Now, being a little tougher, and on occasion when need by, a little nastier, I can look on the 35 years I've spent with them and know there was something I can finally say I stuck with--besides being with a certain wonderful lady who has patiently put up with my typing, my cooking, my driving, and my terrible jokes.  Thank God I made it this far!!


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

24-9-2016 13:20:55  #17


Re: old typewriters

  My 16 year old granddaughter  hand wrote  to me asking for one of my typewriters.  She reminded me of the fun she had playing with one when she last visited.  She added, "I promise to faithfully type letters  to you."  Sucker that I am I sent her my Olivetti Lettera 24 and Richard Poult's book..  Typewriter works well and is nice and compact.  Keeping my fingers crossed that she will bond with it (She is in accelerated creative writing, so just sayin' )
  

     Thread Starter
 

24-9-2016 16:48:50  #18


Re: old typewriters

Write her a letter first with one of your other typewriters, and see if she writes you back.  If she does, you can tell how her writings skills are coming along, also. If she doesn't right away, keep flooding her mail box with letters.  Sooner or later, she'll take the hint and write something to you.  Good luck.


Underwood--Speeds the World's Bidness
 

Board footera

 

Powered by Boardhost. Create a Free Forum