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09-12-2018 05:06:11  #771


Re: New Member Thread

thetypewriterman wrote:

Welcome to the forum Evan (tinkeringtypist) !  Your Imperial GC has a cork platen ............. but the cork platen is excellent and will have retained its elasticity after all these years.  A rubber platen would have gone rock-hard by now of course.

Craft shops have supplies of very thin cork sheet.  I was wondering if these would be a good temporary 'fix' for a petrified platen?  Any experience?
 


Sincerely,
beak.
 
 

09-12-2018 07:13:44  #772


Re: New Member Thread

Re: putting cork on a platen.  I would be very interested to know if anyone manages this.  From looking at production platens, I know that the cork was glued on in a long spiral strip.  It was probably sanded to the exact diameter afterwards in a lathe.  Cork doesn't grip the paper as well as rubber, but it doesn't deteriorate in the same way either.  Wartime apart, it was always offered as an alternative to rubber, but maybe only 5% of typewriters were so fitted because of the poor paper feed.

 

09-12-2018 10:24:31  #773


Re: New Member Thread

thetypewriterman wrote:

Right at the end of the war, Imperial were so hard up for rubber that they even started to fit cork feet.

This particular machine has cork grommets, but a rubber ring around them on the bottom of the case for the feet.

beak wrote:

Craft shops have supplies of very thin cork sheet.

I might look into this if I can't find a way to clean the ink off of the existing one. But I've got quite a few other machines to get to work on first before I attempt such a thing.


The Tinkering Typist, Master Tinkerteer.
https://thetinkeringtypist.blogspot.com/

My Typewriters at The Typewriter Database
 

09-12-2018 12:42:23  #774


Re: New Member Thread

beak wrote:

  My method is crash it all out triple-spaced, and then sit with a pen and read and correct, perhaps massively.  Then retype.  That's usually all it takes for me to get the thoughts down coherently.

Double-spacing, while trying to scribble notes with a pen on a waffley paper that has no backing, so I don't actually scribble on the platen as I'm backing up two lines to change a phrase before I forget what I wanted to write....    Of course, then I really go over it later, after it's off the typewriter.
 

 

09-12-2018 14:14:33  #775


Re: New Member Thread

thetypewriterman wrote:

Cork doesn't grip the paper as well as rubber, but it doesn't deteriorate in the same way either.  Wartime apart, it was always offered as an alternative to rubber, but maybe only 5% of typewriters were so fitted because of the poor paper feed.

Just bought my first cork platen machine, it fits this bill exactly. The cork is resilient and quiet to the extent that the chief source of noise is rattling in the action, but the paper starts to tilt near the bottom of the page. Of course I have machines with slick rubber platens which do the same, but interested to know this one example of cork is behaving according to the breed.
 

 

09-12-2018 15:01:35  #776


Re: New Member Thread

On writing on typewriters:

Yes to everything everybody has said, ever ... well, almost ever.  I am not a writer but i love to write and I too over-edit in one operation when using a computer.  There is a writer's tool which costs several hundred dollars, don't see why the user does not just go out and buy a typewriter already but I suppose there are some advantages to this method, which does not allow you to edit as you go nor do anything else except write; I read a review of this device by a young writer born into the world of computers and he felt it necessary to explain to his readers that the machine produced something called a "draft", though he was not sure he preferred this to "writing", which to him meant the combined writing and editing operation.

Writing indeed clarifies the thinking, moreover it is a form of thinking with an external aid, and add-on eprom which you can burn as you go and reprocess later; it's not just the committing thoughts to paper (or e-ink) but to language, which forces a certain clarification of the necessary but inchoate and inarticulate proto-thoughts of the unconscious: language was the greatest aid in igniting human thought and writing was like unto it taking it to another power of ten, though sometimes I have to admit that thoughts can get through the physical gateway into the external ROM a lot faster via a computer keyboard: but heck, I like typewriters anyway.

I'd hate to admit that 80 typewriters were a step in the wrong direction... What could be wrong with 80 typewriters? 

 

13-12-2018 13:20:22  #777


Re: New Member Thread

My name is Noah and I'm from NYC. I'm a writer and I find that my typewriter slows me down and improves my writing.  I have a Remington Noiseless Portable and a Hermes Featherweight.  I have grown to love typewriters and I want to know/have more and more and more.

 

14-12-2018 12:51:01  #778


Re: New Member Thread

Hi, Noah!   Yeah, it's easy to get hooked, isn't it?  I don't know how many of us here are writers, but judging from this thread, I'm beginning to suspect more than a few. 

 

18-12-2018 19:33:11  #779


Re: New Member Thread

CoronaGirl wrote:

  I don't hop over to the Internet by opening a web browser every time I want to look up something
 

I tried it though. When I first got my Royal I typed to the end of a thought, returned the carriage and typed "Google".

But then I couldn't find the Enter key, so it didn't work.


 

 

20-12-2018 10:56:02  #780


Re: New Member Thread

CoronaGirl wrote:

Hi, Noah!   Yeah, it's easy to get hooked, isn't it?  I don't know how many of us here are writers, but judging from this thread, I'm beginning to suspect more than a few. 

Yes, very easy! Thank you for the warm welcome!

-Noah

 

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