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14-11-2020 16:01:53  #11


Re: Shangas' Guide to Buying Typewriters

Fear not, the Internet Archive set out to rescue us. Here's a copy of the original article in the Internet Archive's wayback machine: https://web.archive.org/web/20150106013530/http://scheong.wordpress.com/2012/12/27/buying-a-typewriter-what-you-need-to-know/

It takes quite long to load, but it does load eventually.
 

 

14-11-2020 18:30:27  #12


Re: Shangas' Guide to Buying Typewriters

I've had mixed results using the Wayback Machine. It often depends on how popular a website is (was), its size, and complexity. Some websites I've searched for were completely missing, some produced partial pages, and some were near complete. Using it is a Hail Mary play in my experience. I'm glad it worked for Pete's request.

It's a shame that more isn't done to archive internet data (or maybe it is and I'm just not aware of it). You would think that technological dictatorships such as Google would do more in this regard.


https://i.imgur.com/OZeuKtA.jpg
 

14-11-2020 19:05:33  #13


Re: Shangas' Guide to Buying Typewriters

Hi Sirius,

Thank you so much for posting the archive link.  I was able to move the article over to my word-processor application and then saved the file on to my drives.

I have a young kid (13 years old) in our neighborhood that I wanted to provide with such info. so he can begin his journey.  I had him and his mother over to view my small collection (16 machines) in person and they are both excited about getting him his first machine.

Thank you, again, for your time in finding the archive link for us...

 

15-11-2020 03:48:03  #14


Re: Shangas' Guide to Buying Typewriters

Uwe wrote:

I've had mixed results using the Wayback Machine. It often depends on how popular a website is (was), its size, and complexity

Definitely, The Wayback Machine is not a solution, it is a workaround at best. Though in cases like these, it's the only resource we still have available. FWIW, it is possible to manually archive a site into the wayback machine by entering its URL into the corresponding box on the Wayback Machine's front page.

And forgive my wording. It was late and I was a little exaggerating.

Uwe wrote:

It's a shame that more isn't done to archive internet data (or maybe it is and I'm just not aware of it).

There exists a small discussion on that topic in academia, as we need a permanent way to refer to existing works, even if they were published on the Internet. To get a permanent identifier, the publisher can piggyback on the already existing DOI system. For journals with liberal licenses like the CreativeCommons (CC) licenses, it is then possible most notably for libraries to archive the article on their own infrastructure and store it under the DOI. It could also be stored under the URL, but DOIs are guaranteed to never be given out twice, which can happen with URLs if domain ownership changes.

However, this discussion has not yet lead anywhere to my knowledge. Few libraries actually do the storing, and the majority of publishers does not publish their articles under the required libreral licenses. Today, most academic articles still are published in print journals, which are then archived the traditional way as printed, bound year volumes in libraries. Given I am a paper fanatic, I am not at all aversed to this traditional model, but if someone really wants to publish online, there should be an actual archiving strategy.

In case the above link was not enough to explain the CreativeCommons licensing concept, there's an extensive book by Till Kreutzer freely available online (under a CC license). For a while, Wikimedia gave out free printed copies of this book, but I am not sure if they still do that.

Pete E. wrote:

Thank you so much for posting the archive link.  I was able to move the article over to my word-processor application and then saved the file on to my drives.

With regard to this specific article, it is indeed a shame that it does only exist in the Wayback Machine. It is a good read. Sadly I was not able to find any licensing information on that archived page that would allow us to republish it (oh, don't ask for the legal ground on which the Internet Archive operates -- this is actually a grey area). If anyone knows a way to contact the author of this article and could ask him if he is willing to license it under a CreativeCommons license like CC-BY-SA or CC-BY-ND, I would gladly republish the article somewhere.

 

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